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Full text of "Small Home Builder's Yearbook"

I 



AUTHORITATIVE 

INFORMATION 

ON 

DESIGNING 



FINANCING 
CONSTRUCTING 

EQUIPPING 

DECORATING 
FURNISHING 



TWENTY-FIVE CENTS 




HOW TO GET A 
90 PER CENT FHA-INSURED LOAN 



THIS EDITION 1,000,000 COPIES 



. . . qA Home of Tour Own 

for A DOLLAR A DAY! 

These Homes were built near Washington, in 1938, as a Unit of 
NATIONAL SMALL HOMES DEMONSTRATION 

A nation-wide cooperative activity of the building 
industries toward Better Homes at Lower Costs for 
More People. 

They represent economies in design, materials, 
equipment, construction. 

The Road to Good Housing is being hned ^\'ith 
Lumber Built Homes. 

For information on Home Building and Financing 
see your Lumber Merchant — He Knows! 

NATIONAL LUMBER MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATION 

NATIONAL RETAIL LUMBER DEALERS ASSOCIATION 

Washington, D. C. 



ONE DOLLAR . . . aUo 

Buys a Complete Set of Plans of 
Any of These Homes Which You 
Can Afford to Build ... 

You, too, may have one of these well-studied and cost-tested 
low-priced homes. . . . The great buihling material manufac- 
turers participating in the NATIONAL SMALL HOMES DEM- 
ONSTRATION, help show you the way to a new home to 
meet your family's needs at even less than a dollar-a-day. They 
have made available the complete working drawings, material 
lists and specifications for all of these Demonstration Homes 
at merely nominal cost. . . . ONE DOLLAR PER HOUSE. 

These eight Fcdcral-Housing-Administration ajiprovcd de- 
signs will accommodate families requiring from three to seven 
rooms. Any one of the homes maj' be built and purchased 
on monthly payments lower than the average rent for less at- 
tractive accommoilations. . . . Order your set of jilans today 
and ask your local lumber merchant for complete building prices. 

Ofiicial government cost reports 
now indicate that it costs less to 
build now than at any time during 
the past three years. . . . Don't wait! 

House No. 1 is a one-bedroom 
design; Houses Nos. 2, 3, 5 and 8 
are two-bedroom; Houses Nos. 4 
and 6, three-bedroom and House 
No. 7, four-bedroom designs. These 
plans also show the possibilities of 
variations, additions and extensions 
for the growing family and the 
growing income. 





NOW 



SEND FOR VOUR PLANS 

National Small Homes Demonstration 
1337 Connecticut Avenue 
Washington, D. C. 
Gentlemen: 

I am interested in a low-cost home for my family and I enclose herewith 

for which please send me sets of plans, 

material lists and specifications for low-cost demonstration home designs 

Nos 

Name 

Address 

City 



^ 



State 



Copyrighted, 1938, >jatiunal Small Homes Bureau, inc. 



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^^ After fhe fair, far places, this is best: 
^ The well-known language and the labeled door, 
The peace that waits for him who asks no more. 
To be at home, to be no more a guest, 
Though loved, though honored; forever to have 

turned 
From pleasures mixed with mystery, and have 

come 
Into one's own again — ^this is the sum 
Of earthly good. . , . O measureless 
The bounty of a universe wherein 
One who has had his fill of glamor at last, 
May travel back again and find the past. 
And be at home among his kind and kin. 



ifT' r ^ 



(From Balm in Gilead, by Hclcne Mullins. 
Copyright, Harper & Brothers) 



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YOU'LL NEVER BUILD BETTER 



THE great American custom of 
fondly recalling "the good old days" 
often is based on sentiment rather 
than fact. Actually, honest comparison 
between the old and the new is the only 
true way to estimate values. The 1918 
automobile has no value today, and the 
radio that cost $100 ten years ago is so 
out-of-date that you can buy a better one 
anywhere for fifty. It is not how much you 
pay, but how much you get for tvhat you 
pay that really counts! 

The remarkable development of science 
and engineering in America has given in- 
dustry tools to make better and less costly 
goods. There are many, many examples 
of invention, discovery and research that 
have made life easier to live and nowhere 
is this more true than in home-making, a 
science that has shown more progress than 
any other part of our cultural life. 

Ten Years of Improvements 
What a difference ten years make! The 
only permanent thing in this whole wide 



world of ours is change! — Changing times 
and changing standards; improvements, 
innovations and progress! These are the 
very life-blood of our great country. And 
the home of today moves onward with the 
times. Improvements in the arts of de- 
signing and building, in materials and 
equipment, have given us a finished prod- 
uct — a complete package — more beautiful, 
more livable, and more economical! 



Think back for a moment. Ten years 
ago a frame house costing $13,000 had 
perhaps seven rooms, one bath, hardwood 
floors, hot water heat, and a detached ga- 
rage. Today the same money will build a 
larger house of^brick. It will have seven 
rooms, two baths, a first floor lavatory, a 
kitchen that is a housewife's dream, a rec- 
reation room, and a built-in garage. It will 
be winter air-conditioned, automatically 
heated, and it will have plumbing and 
lighting fixtures that could only be found 
in the more expensive homes in 1928. It 
will be, in every way, a better house. 

Built for fhe Future 
Moreover, homes today are being built 
to meet tomorrow's requirements, so they 
will not be out of date ten years from now. 
Building methods today follow engineer- 
ing precepts that allow for the scientific 
advancements of tomorrow. Room for 
room and item for item the 1938 home 
gives values — present and future — that 

SMALL HOME BUILDERS YEAR BOOK 1938-1939 EDITION' 



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couldn't be had at any price ten years ago. 
So think about this when you are thinking 
about buying or building a home! 

Better Materials — Better Equipment 

While it is true that some material prices 
are above 1928 levels, other materials of 
lower cost, higher cost, higher quality, and 
that take less labor to install, have replaced 
old standbys. So, when you compare home 
values, don't put too much emphasis on 
the wage of a carpenter or the cost of a 
pane of glass. The house you actually get 
jar the money is the only true estimate. 
Greater experience of builders and archi- 
tects, finer equipment, better materials, 
and the increased skill of craftsmen, all are 
contributing to building better homes at 
lower costs. 

Air conditioning was iust being devel- 
oped for houses in 1928. Today it is avail- 
able for hundreds of homes — and it will 
be a necessity, not a luxury, tomorrow. 

Automatic heat is now standard equip- 
ment in even the moderate priced home. 
Ten years ago it was a rarity. 

The manufacturers of insulating mate- 
rials have so standardized their products 
and reduced prices that 1938 homes are 



cooler in summer, warmer in winter, and 
cost less to heat than the typical house of 
1928. 

Recreation rooms were either luxuries or 
patchwork affairs in 1928. They find place 
today in even the modest home, because 
better-built basements and compact heating 
equipment have added 15% to usable 
space in the average home without any 
increase in cost. 

In 1928 an expensive home probably 
had a mechanical refrigerator, but not a 
"planned" kitchen. Today's moderate 
priced homes have eflficient refrigerating 
and cooking equipment, compact cabinet 
units, fine sinks, special lighting and floor- 
ing, all scientifically worked out to make 
the Job of cooking quicker, easier and 
more pleasant. 




A Lot More House for Your Money 

These are plus-features in the modern 
home today that were not to be had when 
houses were built ten years ago. They add 
hundreds of dollars in values and yet they 
are standard features. The building in- 
dustry and the architectural profession 
have kept pace with modern conditions 
and have created more comfortable homes, 
more beautiful homes and more lasting 
homes, without increasing the cost. 

All this means that the 1938 building 
dollar goes further than ever. By any 
standard of comparison, the compact, con- 
venient efficient home of 1938, a complete 
living unit, is infinitely better than its 
predecessors! 

It Is Easier to Select a Home 

Ten years ago your choice was limited 
— but today the building industry has pro- 
vided VARIETY ... a selection of styles, 
sizes, and prices to fit the requirements of 
every family. You no longer have to ac- 
cept something designed for an earlier 
generation when you seek a home. It's 
easy to find exactly what you want, either 
as a finished house ready for your occu- 
pancy, or in plan form from which to 
build to suit yourself. f 



Have you been waiting for building 
costs to go down? If you have, you 
will be surprised at the facts given here, 
for they prove that now is probably the 
most favorable time to build that you 
will face for five or ten years to come! 

Here are the reasons: 

(1) Building Sites Cost Less: The 

real estate market is now below 1926 
values in almost all sections of the coun- 
try. Inquire from your own real estate 
broker; compare present prices with 
those recorded for sales ten or twelve 
years ago. When the business trend 
starts upward, land values will rise 
along with other values. 

(2) Nev/ Financing Methods Pro- 
vide Savings: FHA insurance for mort- 
gages has made the financing of new 
homes cheaper than ever before. Under 
former methods a $5,000 first mortgage, 
periodically renewed, would cost $6,500 
in interest alone in 20 years and at the 
end of this period you would still owe 
the S5,000. Under the present FHA in- 



BUILD NOW AND SAVE 

sured mortgage for the same amount, 
you would pay out in twenty years a to- 
tal of 18,911.20 on a $5,000 loan. But 
at the end of that period you would owe 
nothing. The difference between the 
old and the new plans would save you 
$2,588.80. 

(3) Building Plans Are Better: Mod- 
ern houses are more efficiently planned, 
have less waste space and provide more 
livability, comfort and simplified house- 
keeping than comparable dwellings de- 
signed 10 or 15 years ago. The cost of 
useful space has gone down. 

(4) Material Costs: The United 
States Bureau of Labor Statistics has 
prepared a chart showing that the aver- 
age of all building material costs in No- 
vember, 1937, was approximately 6% 
less than in 1926. Observation indicates 
that average costs have not risen since 
this chart was published. 

(5) Labor Costs: Labor, working 
with better tools and under more skilled 
direction, is producing more today per 



dollar of wage than it did in 1926 ifi 
spite of increased wage scales. This 
condition will change when the demand 
for building labor exceeds the limited 
supply, 

(6) Equipment Prices Have De- 
clined: Plumbing fixtures that cost $100 
in 1926 now cost about $78. The aver- 
age cost of a conversion oil burner was 
then $800; last year the average installed 
price was $295. Electric refrigerators 
which sold for $270 in 1928 now sell for 
$172. A residential coal stoker which 
cost $585 in 1926 can be purchased for 
around $260 today. Improved produc- 
tion methods have lowered the cost of 
many similar standard items of equip- 
ment. 

More for Your Money: 

Today you get more value for your 
building dollar than at any time in the 
past. Today you also face a favorable 
buying period that may not be repeated 
until another cycle of prosperity has 
passed. 



SMALL HOME BUILDERS YEAR BOOK 1938-1939 EDITION 



7 




AMERICAN FARMHOUSE 





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FOR THE HOME OWNER 



MODERN 



E.*a^j-Jirrr 



HAVE you chosen the architectural 
style you want for your new 
house? Most people start think- 
ing about houses in terms ot style — just as 
a woman thinks about a new dress or a 
hat — long before they consider its service- 
ability. Often the first choice, made this 
way, proves to be the best choice in the 
end, but it may lead to strange results. 

For architectural styles are far different 
from fashions. They were not created by 
some popular designer, to become the 
vogue of the moment. Rather, they grew 
out of many trials to find the best design 
for the climate, the people and the con- 
struction methods which prevailed during 
the years when the style took shape. And 
so today, an architectural style is not some- 
thing to pick off the shelf; it should be 
chosen to fit the neighborhood, the plan, 
the construction materials, and the purse. 
Here are some suggestions that may help 
to choose a style suited to your house: 

(1) Choose a style that fits your neigh- 
borhood. When a mortgage application is . 
being examined for insurance by the Fed- 
eral Housing Administration considerable 
weight is given by the examiner to what 
is called "conformity to neighborhood." 
This means that a new house should look 
well in relation to the houses nearby. 

This does not mean that a new house 
should copy its neighbors; far from it! 
But if the trend were toward Colonial 
styles, there might be any variation from 
formal Georgian to Cape Cod, for the un- 
derlying simplicity of line and detail would 
help the houses live well together. 

(2) Let the plan influence the exterior. 
Each style in architecture grew out of char- 
acteristic room arrangements, and these in 
turn evolved from climate and social hab- 
its. The Cape Cod cottage, for example, 
had need for more room space on the 
ground floor than in the sleeping loft 
above. If your family wants most of its 
rooms on the ground floor, the Cape Cod 
cottage style may prove appropriate. 

Elizabethan and Tudor English houses 
originally had stone roofs and used heavy 
oak timbers for their framing. To get the 
steep-pitched roofs the rainy climate de- 
manded, it was necessary to keep the 
houses narrow; otherwise the roofs would 
be too high and too heavy. So these 
dwellings are characterized by a shallow. 



extended plan. If your plan works out 
that way, then one of these English styles 
will probably fit it, 

(3) Your preference for materials will 
exert a strong influence on the style of 
your house. Stucco, without half -timber- 
ing — came to us from the Mediterranean 
Area, and from the Spanish haciendas of 
early California and the southwest. With 
it is associated the clay tile roof of rather 
low pitch. Stucco in combination with 
timber and stone or brick developed in 
Norman France and England, because 
stucco was used as a sort of plaster over 
the rough masonry employed to fill in be- 
tween the heavy wooden timbers. With 
this use of stucco we find slate roofs, or 
clay shingle tiles. 

Brick is a universal material, used in all 
countries, in all periods. Only the man- 
ner of using it varied, according to the 
quality and color of the local brick and 
the skill of the masons. Wood shingles 
and clapboards and other forms of board 
. siding developed in countries where wood 
was plentiful and easy to work, notably 
right here in America. Stone cannot be 
carried far, except at great expense, so it 
always has a local character. 

The thing to avoid is the misuse of ma- 
terials in a style that calls for some well 
established combination. To combine a 
Spanish clay tile roof with a siding of 
hand-split shingles would be something 
like wearing a silk top hat with pajamas. 
(4) Don't imitate any style, unless the 
original you are copying is in excellent 
taste and really fits your lot, your plan, 
your preferred materials and your way of 
living. Rarely are present needs identical 
with those that governed the development 
of the original. 

Good design is more important than 
faithful adherence to an established style. 
Good design is a matter of taste, resulting 
in permanent attractiveness. Simplicity, 
proportion, unity, harmony are elements 
of character that result in pleasing design. 
These qualities are not common, they are 
the result of natural skill and long training. 
Styles change in popularity, good uc- 
sign never loses its appeal. Architects to- 
day are designing for the present and the 
future. Inspired by the best that has gone 
before, they create new compositions and 
new beauty when opportunity affords. 



SMALL HOME BUILDERS YEAR B O O K— 1 9 3 8 - 1 9 3 9 EDITION 




How much is a lot worth, and why 
does one lot cost more than an- 
other? 

Until you can answer these questions 
the purchase of a home site is something 
I of a gamble. Three things determine the 

il proper price for a lot: the neighborhood, 

the size and physical condition of the lot, 
and the state of national prosperity. 

Neighborhood is most important for it 
embraces many things. The Federal Hous- 
ing Administration, when appraising a 
mortgage for insurance, pays a great deal 
of attention to the present and probable 
future character of the neighborhood. 

Ideally, the location should be protected 
against influences that lessen values, such 
as the encroachment of industrial districts 
or the introduction of apartment houses 
among dwellings. Protection by means of 
good zoning laws or legal restrictions is 
considered highly desirable. 

A fairly uniform development of the 
neighborhood increases land values. The 
houses should be approximately of the 
same age, size and general character. A 
new house among old houses is likely to 
suffer in value as the older homes get out 
of date. A small house among large ones, 
or a luxurious house among inexpensive 
homes will be at a disadvantage if the time 
conies when it must be resold. 

Of course land that is accessible to 
schools, churches, stores and amusement 
centers is worth more than land far away 
from these conveniences. 

If the neighborhood is served by a pub- 
lic water supply, fire hydrants, sewerage 
systems, electricity and gas it is worth 
more than one that lacks any of these 
1 utilities. The reason is simple: if you 



have to drill your own well, build a septic 
tank, put in your own lighting system or 
pay extra for fire insurance, you should pay 
correspondingly less for the land. 

The level of taxes and the likelihood 
of local assessments similarly affect neigh- 
borhood values. But when comparing 
taxes between one town and another, do 
not be guided by the tax rate alone. It 
is the actual tax bill that counts. This 
bill may be lower in a town that has a 
high tax rate and places a low "assessed 
value" on property than in another com- 
munity with a somewhat lower tax rate 
and high valuations. 

Tax rates affect whole towns but special 
assessments may affect only neighborhoods. 
These may be levied for new schools, utili- 
ties, paving or curbing, tree planting or 
other public improvements that affect only 
one part of the community. Therefore a 
location fully developed with all reasonable 
improvements is worth more than one sub- 
ject to assessments later on. 

And finally the "appeal" of a neighbor- 
hood influences its value, because it makes 
people like it or dislike it according to its 
relative charm. The layout of streets, the 
presence of trees, the architectural attrac- 
tiveness of existing houses, even such a 
thing as "social desirability" contributes to 
this quality of appeal. 

All of these things should be borne in 
mind when choosing between communities 
and neighborhoods. They determine the 
probable future value as well as set the gen- 
eral level of present values. 

What makes one lot worth more than 
another in the same neighborhood? 

Size, of course, comes first. Location in 
the block, outlook or view, nearness to 



By 

HERBERT V. NELSON 

Executive Vice-President 
NATfOXAI. ASSOCIATIOiV OF 
REAI. ESTATE ItOAims 



transportation lines but remoteness from 
traffic noises come next, according to what 
you are seeking. A corner location costs 
more than a lot within a block because it 
offers two free outlooks, but it means more 
sidewalks to clean and more exposure to 
traffic. You can take your choice. 

Sometimes, however, the differenc«s in 
physical character of two nearby lots will 
change their values. If one is rocky and 
the other clear, the latter should be worth 
more than the former because of extra costs 
of blasting, excavation and grading. If one 
lot is well drained, the other wet, the differ- 
ence in price should pay for installing 
drains. If one is sloping and the other flat, 
if one has trees and the other none, and if 
one has a good view and the other a poor 
one, the price should reflect the cost of 
making both equally desirable. 

In short, a lot priced at $500 may cost 
you more than another valued at $1,500 if 
you have to spend more than $1,000 extra 
to have as attractive a home on the cheaper 
land as you would on the other. 

There remains only the final factor — - 
national prosperity — and this no one seems 
able to control. When people are prosper- 
ous they have money to spend and will use 
it more freely to buy what they want. Then 
land values rise because there are more 
buyers with ready cash. 

Fortunately for those who want to build 
today land costs are only beginning to ad- 
vance from the low to which they were 
forced by the past nine years of depression. 
Informed observers believe that land costs 
are today at the lowest that may be ex- 
pected for more than a decade. This, is one 
reason why today is the time to build. 



SMALL HOME BUILDERS YEAR BOOK 1938-1939 EDITION 



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THE fundamentals of good planning for moderate cost 
houses are shown in the drawing on the opposite page. 
They are reliable guides to plans economical to construct, 
and to houses easy to maintain, pleasant to live in and readily 
salable. The plans presented on the following six pages fulfill 
these requirements. They show how much variety may be had 
Vfithout violating these simple principles. Perhaps one of them 
will be just what you want — at least they may serve as starting 
points for developing your own ideas. 

Before any plan (or completed house) can be chosen intelli- 
gently, you must know what your family actually needs in num- 
ber of rooms, room sizes, wall spaces for furniture and treasured 
possessions, and closet and storage spaces. When these things 
are known and finances have been considered, hunting can pro- 
ceed soundly. Whether to buy or build demands careful thought. 
There are five principal ways of acquiring a new home: a brief 
survey of them may help you decide. 

1. You can buy a house already built by some reliable de- 
veloper or builder. This is the simplest method if you can find 
just what you want, in a location you like, at the price you can 
afford. This is the only method that enables you to see the 
finished product before you buy, but you must be a good judge 
of construction and property values, and you should satisfy your- 
self that the hidden parts are as good as the parts you can see. 

2. You may buy a set of "stock" plans and specifications and 
have the house built for you by a reliable contractor. Such plans 
cost from $2 per set up to $5 or more per room; the latter 
usually are more complete and carefully studied. Bids may be 
invited from several good builders to make certain that the price 
to be paid is fair. Extra costs, not covered in the general con- 
tract, such as grading, planting, hardware, etc., should be added 
and the total kept within your budget. A lawyer should pre- 
pare all contracts. Some of the many sources of stock plans and 
specifications are listed on page 8. 

3. Stock plans may be obtained through certain architectural 
groups at prices which include limited but highly desirable pro- 
fessional services, such as minor adaptations of the plan to your 
special needs, aid in getting bids, preparation of contracts and 
periodic supervision of construction. This method brings to the 
owner expert guidance at low cost. 

4. The single contract method is used in a number of sub- 
divisions and developments. Under it the developer, or a con- 
tractor, undertakes to provide a completed home, ready to move 
into, for a price set in advance. This includes planning, financ- 
ing and construction. It demands complete faith in the builder, 
for the buyer has little control once the contracts are signed. 

5. Complete architectural service, from start to finish, has 
long been proven the most satisfactory method, especially for 
houses of more than six rooms, or costing above $7,500. The 
architect makes sketches, prepares working drawings and speci- 
fications, obtains bids, aids in the award of contracts (including 
the preparation of all contract documents) and finally supervises 
construction to be certain that the contract is fulfilled. Contrary 
to general opinion, charges for these services do not add to the 
cost of a house. The Federal Housing Administration allows 
architect's fees as a proper cost of a new property. 




^A^ 



I BELIEVE you will be happier . . . you yourself . , . 
your family . . . that YOU will know a pride of posses- 
sion ... an increased prestige among friends and neigh- 
bors ... a satisfying sense of security . . . ALL when you 
build a HOME OF YOUR OWN. 

I believe, too, that your community will benefit ... for your 
home and all that goes with it is the very warp and woof of 
community life . . . yes, it even helps the welfare of our great 
nation ... so you can invest profitably on the long — not the 
short — side of America through owning your oWn home. 

Our code is simple. While this publication should be a 
sound economic enterprise, its first obligation is to give you full 
information and sound counsel on every phase of home-making. 
We want to help you realize your dream ... so that your 
home, properly financed, well designed, soundly built with 
modern equipment, decorations and furnishings will be a life- 
long satisfaction to you — and yours. 

I have told hundreds of manufacturers and dealers that you, 
and the million other Americans who want to know the joys 
of home-ownership, are a real challenge to them ... a chal- 
lenge to give you better products— better materials,* at better 
values that will impel you to put HOME OWNERSHIP at 
the top of your "MUST" list ... and further, to work together 
to give you, .through these columns, complete data about these 
products, materials, values and their place in the complete house. 
Many individual manufacturers and associations, such as 
American Gas Assoc, Edison Electric Inst., National Electrical 
Manufacturers Assoc, National Small Homes Demonstration, 
Pordand Cement Assoc, Structural Clay Products Inst., have 
accepted this challenge ... and you will find herein the first 
fruits of their labors. Others to be commended are the American 
Institute of Architects, The Producers' Council, the United States 
Chamber of Commerce and its local branches, the Pierce Foun- 
dation. Each in Its own way is helping mightily this great 
building industry to reach Its objective of more and better homes 
for more American families. 



i^^^^^'^^^^^^^^^'^^ 



SMALL HOME BUILDERS YEAR BOOK 1938-1939 

a publication of National Small Homes Bureau, Inc., Executive and edi- 
torial ollices, 572 Madison Ave., New York. W. Wadsworth Wood, 
President and National Director; John F. Gowen, Vice President and 
Managing Director; M. Wood, Secretary. 
JOHN F. GOWEN WILLIAM EDGAR TYLER S. ROGERS 
Editor FISHER Consulting Editor 
Art Director 



THE COVER 

The attractive young couple holding the model of their dream home is from 
the brush of McClelland Barclay, noted American illustrator. The model 
house is shown by courtesy of Ladies' Home Journal, Philadelphia, Pa. 

ACKNOWLEDGMENT 

is made to the many persons who contributed so much in so many ways to the 
preparation of this book. Thanks are due particularly to The Washington 
Post, Washington, D. C, and Business Week, New York, for their courtesy 
in supplying basic data on building costs, rents, etc. 



SMALL HOME BUILDERS YEAR BOO K 1938-1939 EDITION 




Rccfan^lar shape means mintmum number of corners 

Bal-h and KI^chen plumbing grouped for economy 

5t-ock Millwork ( Windows, Doors and 
Cupboards efc.,) for economy 

Spaciousness of Living Room 
increased by Dining Alcove. 

Sfandard len^fhs 
of Lumber saves 
cutHng. 



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Wall space in Bed 
Rooms arranged for 
furnifure. Bed Rms 
to have privacy and 
cross venhlahon. 

No wasfe space 
in Halfs 

Plenb/ of 
Closets 




Entrance Hall 
^ives privacy to 
Living Room 



Enough wall space for furnirure in all Rooms 



House placed on Lof so Living Room commands besf view and maximum sunlight- 




Coal- Closet- 
near Fronl- 
Entrance 




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euan.^ 



FOR SMALL HOMES 



You can get plans for any of the 
homes on the next 6 pages by writ- 
ing to National Small Homes Bu- 
reau, 572 Madison Ave., New York. Or 
if you want to deal direct — 

HOUSES 1 to 7, and 9— Complete plans, 
including ways of enlarging each house, 
can be had through your local lumber 
dealer, or from National Lumber Manu- 
facturers Association, 1337 Connecticut 
Ave., Washington, D. C. 

HOUSES 8, and 15 to 19— can be ob- 
tained from State and Regional Lumber 
Dealer Associations, tbrough your local 
lumber dealer, or from National Retail 
Lumber Dealers Association, Union Trust 
Building, Washington, D. C. 

HOUSES 10 and 11— can be had from 
Structural Clay Products Institute, 1427 
Eye St., Washington, D. C. 

HOUSES 12, 13 and 14— can be ob- 
tained through the Portland Cement Asso- 
ciation, 33 W. Grand Ave., Chicago, III. 

When writing for any of these plans 
BE SURE YOU GIVE THE NUMBER 



OF THE HOUSE and also say "ON 
PAGE .... OF SMALL HOME BUILD- 
ERS YEAR BOOK, 1938-1939 EDL 
TION." This is necessary because the 
identification numbers do not correspond 
with other designations of these plans. 

Among other Plan Services that can sup- 
ply good small house designs readily 
financed under the FH/^. Program are: — 

American Builder, 105 W, Adams St., 
Chicago, 111. 

American Lumberman, 431 S. Dearborn 
St., Chicago, 111. 

Architects' Small House Service Bureau, 
1200 2nd Ave., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Federal Home Loan Bank System, Fed- 
eral Home Loan Bank Bldg., Washington, 
D. C. 

Ladies' Home Journal, Philadelphia, Pa. 

National Plan Service, 1315 W. Con- 
gress St., Chicago, 111. 

Woman's Home Companion, 250 Park 
Ave., New York. 



HOW MONTHLY PAYMENTS 
ARE FIGURED 

The houses on pages 9-14 are priced 
with approximate monthly payments un- 
der the FHA Plan (see page 20). These 
have been figured from estimates (in some 
cases actual costs) of labor, materials and 
builder's profit, as well as average taxes. 
Financing costs and land values are not 
included. It is assumed that the latter are 
equal to the down payments. 

To get the Approximate Cost of any 
house, multiply Monthly Payment by the 
following factors: For Houses Nos, 11 and 
12 multiply by 117.0; for all other houses 
multiply by 112.4. 

While these figures vary widely in dif- 
ferent localities they will help determine 
how much house you can get for your 
money. But they should not in any sense 
be regarded as estimates or statements of 
cost; and should be carefully checked by 
your local builder, architect, or others per- 
son familiar with local building conditions. 





^pa^mSimumi^ mark gracious 

MODERN HOMES . . . 



® The modern trend is toward light, airy, sunnj' 
homes — that means more windows, larger areas 
of glass. 

The ever-gro^vdng interest in generous use of 
glass has led to new and beautiful forms in archi- 
tectural design and decorative treatments of mn- 
dows. From attic to basement, corner Avindows, 
dining alcoves, picture windows and flower 
windows reflect this modern age of glass. 

In building a new home or remodeling your 
present home, it is most important to use Quality 
Glass because clearer, brighter Window Glass 
affects your entire outlook. Because of an exclu- 
sive manufacturing process, L'O'F Window Glass 
is noted for its greater freedom from waviness and 
distortion, and costs you no more than ordinary 
window glass. When you buy, be sure to look for 
theL'O'F Label of Quality on every pane of glass.Il 
is placed there for your identification and protec- 
tion. LibbeyOwens'Ford Glass Company, Toledo, 



IIBBEY* OWENS vFORD 




SMALL HO. ME liUILDEKS YE.\R BOOK 1938-1939 EDITION 



SEMI-MODERN STYLE with basement built above ground 
and used for living quarters, thus saving the cost of unusable 
space below ground. An unusual house because the living 
room is on the 2nd floor with 2 bedrooms and a bath. The 
1st floor has hall, dining room, l{itchcn, utility {heater) room, 
and garage. The latter is easily convertible into a third bed- 

lom. Foundation size is 24'x27'. 

Estimated Monthly Payments $23.00 to $28.00 — 25 years. 



room. 








NEW ENGLAND COLONIAL type of 6-room 
house, which achieves economy by minimizing the 
cost of excavating for a basement, atid by the over- 
hanging 2nd floor. Compact and roomy at low cost, 
it has \itchen, living-dining room, 3 bedrooms and a 
bath. A lot of house on a small foundation — 16'6"x25' . 
Estimated Monthly Payments $23.00 to $28.00 — 25 
years. 




SECOND flOO» 



\ 



ANOTHER NEW ENGLAND COLONIAL house, 
compact and roomy at very low cost. There are 6 com- 
plete rooms and garage. A 4th bedroom and another 
bath can be easily built in the unfinished space over the 
garage. The foundation size is 23'4"x28' . 
Estimated Monthly Payments $24.50 to $28.00—25 
years. 






SMALL HOME BUILDERS YEAR BOOK 1938-1939 EDITION 







CHARMING TWO-BEDROOM COTTAGE, with 
sanations in exterior treatment that give it an indi- 
viduality all its own. Extreme efficiency in cost of 
budding and in housekeeping is assured by one floor 
with 2 bedrooms, bath, \itchen and living room. A 
stair leads to the heater room in a small basement. 
Foundation size—22'6"x29'7". 

Estimated Monthly Payments $21.00 to $24.50— 
25 years. 



SMALL COTTAGE-TYPE with 3 bedrooms, bath, 
living room, \itchen and utility (heater) room. No 
basement, the money thus saved being used to provide 
more above-ground space. With a foundation size of 
22'6"x38'6" you get lots of house for your money. 
Estimated Monthly Payments $21.00 to $23.50—25 
years. 





STUDIO-TYPE HOUSE tvith living room running 
right through the center, 2 bedrooms, bath, {itchen 
and utility room. Interesting in design and plan and 
admirably suited for a recreation or sumtner cottage, 
and for the Southern and Eastern states. Foundation 
size is 22'6"x36'8'\ 

Estimated Monthly Payments $21.00 to $23.50— 
25 years. 



SMALL HOME BUILDERS YEAR BOOK— 1938-1939 EDITION 




AN ARCHITECTURAL GEM, designed for the family of and laundry in a utility room below the main floor Icvel.and be- 

modest income, this shingled New England type cottage has 2 tween bath and \itchen completes this efficient layout. The 

spacious bedrooms, near the bath, a large living room with fire- garage, 12' from the house, is tied to it by an attractive arbor, 

place and dinette adjoining a modern \itchen. A heating plant Foundation size is 30'x38', 

Estimated Monthly Payments $33.50 to $40.00 — 25 years. 



{ 



1 



"GARDEN APARTMENT" fits this economical house 
with its corner windows assuring good cross-ventilation 
and plenty of wall space far furniture. The large window 
in the living room adds spaciousness. There is no base- 
ment hut a good-sized \itchen and utility (heater) room 
in which a full heating system can be placed. Of compact 
design with no tuaste space this offers the lowest cost 
standard type 2-bedroom house. Foundation size is 
22'10"x3r. 
Estimated Monthly Payments $17.50 to $21.00 — 25 years. 









L.R.& DR. 

Il'4";i l4'-6' 



B.R. 

lOnlt-t" 



[j I THE MINIMUM HOUSE for bachelor 

(man or wormian) or newly-weds. Though 
it doesn't have everything it provides maxi- 
mum accommodations for 2 people at least 
cost. There is no basement. So arranged that 
It can be converted to 2 bedrooms or expanded into 3-bedroom 
house with dining room. Foundation size is 24'6"x24'6" . 
Estimated Monthly Payments $15.00 to $18.50 — 25 years. 



SECOND FLOOR 



FIRST FlOOft 1 

MALL HOME BUILDERS YEAR BOOK — 1938-1939 EDITION 



11 



PRIZE-WIIVIVIJVG 

STRUCTURAL CLAY 

HOUSES 

Here are the two prize winners in 
Structural Clay Products Institute's 1937 
Competition to discover current ideas 
and good architectural practice in the 
design of moderate-cost homes built of 
oric\. 






J L 




SECOND FLOOR 



A beautifully studied 5-room house, simple and 
compact in plan, tvell arranged, economical to 
biuld; garage well placed for front entrance type 
shielded and covered entry for inclement 
lueather; simple good American architecture. 
George D. Conner, Washington, D. C, was the 
prize-wmntng architect. Foundation (exclud- 
ing garage) 20'x28'. Estimated Monthly %v- 
ments $46.00 to $50.00—20 years ' 



This prize-winner, by Atwell John 
King of New Yor{, is a charming 
small house of Southern style, in- 
geniously planned to utilize all avail- 
able space economically. Foundation 
(excluding garage) 27'x3r. 
Estimated Monthly Payments $61.00 
to $64.50—20 years. 




Mr. Conner's design (No. 10) 
won in Class A— 5 rooms, 18.000 
cubic feet and Mr. King's (No. 
11) in Class B—7 rooms, 24,000 
cubic feet. 



12 



SMALL irOME BUILDERS YEAR B O O K - 1 9 3 8 - 1 9 3 9 EDITION 






ind 
to 

pe, 
ent 
ire. 
the 

lid- 
'ay- 




CaNCRETE 



H O U l§ E i^ 




I m 



Compact but roomy is this modern home 
built on an open suburban lot at Garden 
City, Detroit, from plans by Flyod C. 
Wuerth. Kitchen and 2 bedrooms on 1st 
floor easily accessible to large utility room 
and attached garage. 2nd-floor living room 
opens an balcony. Concrete masonry units, 
including curved corner pieces to soften the 
lines, make it clean and fire-safe. Esti- 
mated Monthly Payment — about $32.50 — 
25 years. 



The adaptability of concrete construction 
to any of the popular styles of house archi- 
tecture is shown in this 7nodified French 
style home at Chappaqua, N. Y., from 
plajis by Emil J. Szendy. Large storm- 
shuttered windotvs set in concrete walls 
with shallow quoins about the doorway 
add a feeling of stnrdiness and durability. 
The open plan provides living room, 
kitchen, bedroom, bath and heater room 
on 1st floor, and 2 ample bedrooms and 
bath on 2nd floor, lighted by homey dor- 
mer windows. Fire-safety is assured by 
concrete masonry walls and concrete slab 
floors. These sagproof floors are finished 
with fine wood flooring. Estimated Month- 
ly Payment — about $64.50 — 20 years. 




'.I ALL HOME BUILDERS YEAR BOOK 1938-1939 EDITION 



Another type of concrete home in Orlando, 
Fla. W. Kenneth Miller was the architect. 
One-story tuitb 6 rooms and 2-car garage. 
Small concrete masonry units form walls; 
added texture obtained by emphasising 
joints. Exterior has 2 coats white Portland 
Cement paint; wood trim finished in na- 
tural colors. Furred and plastered u>alls 
are elective barriers against heat. j^^^J' 
mated Monthly Payment— about §46.50 
— 25 years. 



13 








_26'0" 



SPACE. 

KlTCHENTr"2lC'f^l>i R-00A1 
3i"«iLli5'-o| DAT 1 

"I c 1^ 



-&t-0~ftOOM 

io'ei'xi6'&" 




r "'"'^ 



A charming and efficient 
New England cottage with 
entrance direct to living 
room. Note the conveni- 
ence of the wor\ centers, 

IQ'O" 




IktTCHEHl I 

Of«iNGJ?lCt 



CL0VL5T 

PO?CH n LIVING liOOM 
6'o"«7'o'y (dd'xie'o" 



6L0 R.ObA( 

-to^'xe'o" 



lO'd'x D'o" 





LIVTRG POOM 
I2'6"xl4'0' 



_i 



The dining space in the large 
window more than compen- 
sates for the small bedroom. As 
in Nos. 8, 15, 16, and 19, the 
utility is below the main floor 
level. This arrangement ma\es 
this heating unit more efficient. 




A tiny vestibtde adds priva- 
cy to this well-planned lay- 
out, with utility room two 
steps below the main floor. 



2&0' 





&ATH HALL 



ROOM 




The long living room is a feature of this plan, which, unli\e the 
others on this page, has the heating unit in the center. 

Here are five one-story, no-basement homes following the Cape 
Cod cottage tradition, which have all the advantages of economy 
in construction, real livability, and attractive appearance. They 
will lool( well on any lot. Each house has living room, \itchen, 
dining space, utility room {except No. 18 in which the heater is 



The square living room is a feature of this plan, which, by com- 
pact arrangement provides good-sized bedrooms. 

located in a space opetiing from \itchen and hall), bathroom, 2 
bedrooms with closets, a linen closet and a hall. They meet all 
the basic requirements of good design (see page 7). They can 
be built, as is, on level ground, at an estimated cost of from 
$22.00 to $24.50 per month, payable for 25 years. 



14 



SMALL HOJfE BUILDERS YEAR B O O K — 1 9 3 8 - 1 9 3 9 EDITION 




A^ 



afta^^cape 



T 




tu 



dl^LLn^q FOR SMALL HOME GROUNDS 

U By BEIV BLACKBURIIV'^ 



TREES and shrubs outside the house 
are just as important as linen 
closets and furnishings inside. The 
small home is not complete nor is the in- 
vestment safeguarded until the landscape 
blends with it to make a picture that is 
pleasing and desirable. The expense of 
beautifying the small house lot need not 
be much; it averages from 5 to 10 per cent 
of the cost of the house. Entering into this 
cost are the landscape plan, grading, top- 
soil and fertilizers, plant materials and 
lawn grass seed and their installation. 
LANDSCAPE CONSUJ^TANT— Devel- 
oping a lot without a landscape plan is 
apt to bring the same unsatisfactory results 
as building a house without plans. Home 
owners can make their own plans, but they 
should never attempt to without long study 
of the fundamentals of good landscape de- 
sign. Rather than make mistakes at the 
beginning, the home builder should em- 
ploy a competent landscape consultant. 
The moderate fees of these specialists are 
just as true economies as the amounts paid 
for architectural services. 
ORDERLINESS AND UNITY— Cardi- 
nal points in the small home landscape are 
orderliness and unity. If every part of the 
grounds and every plant meet these sim- 
ple requirements the landscape picture will 
be harmonious. 

SMALL BEGINNINGS— If the total cost 
of the planting cannot be allotted at the 
beginning, enough should be set aside to 
pay for the plan and to make a small start. 
The landscape plan is vital because it fre- 
quently shows the desirability of changes 
in the house plan — or perhaps a few de- 
grees difference in orientation, to gain the 
most from a fine tree or a lovely view. A 
modest start in planting should include 
shade trees and lawn. If a few plants can 
be purchased for intimate plantings around 
the house, the picture will be well on its 
way; if the work must be spread over 3 or 
4 years, the owner will enjoy seeing the 
picture take shape. 

AVOID CROWDING— Good houses re- 
quire few plants close to them, and well- 
designed plantings for small areas can ac- 
commodate only a few woody plants. Her- 
baceous perennial and annual flowers are 
important in supplying color and interest 
in intimate garden areas (usually at the 
:k or sides of the house), but trees and 



ALL HOME BUILDERS YEAR BOOK — 1938-1939 EDITION 



shrubs are always the vital parts of the 
home landscape. Specific knowledge about 
the ultimate size and habits of these is 
important, as this will save money spent 
on unsuitable plants and for more than 
can be accommodated without crowding 
after a few years. Many nurseries provide 
this kind of service. There are also books 
for beginning gardeners everywhere. 
NOT TOO MANY EVERGREENS— 
Attractive planting cannot result from a 
brisding array of evergreens crowded 
around a house. Such plantings may be 
pleasing at first, but they usually undergo 
disturbing changes in 5 or 6 years. Modern 
homes seldom have foundations so unat- 
tractive as to necessitate hiding them. 
THE FRONT YARD— A few carefully 
chosen plants to emphasize the doorway 
and groups composed of one plant, or of 
three, fo soften the corners are all that are 
required. With this formula the front 
yard planting becomes 
simplicity itself. As this 
part of the grounds pre- 
sents the house to the 
outward world, it should 
be as attractive as pos- 
sible every month of the 
year. Too many ever- 
greens create a heavy, 
somber aspect. A few 
evergreens for accent 
and deciduous (autumn 
leaf-shedding) shrubs 
and trees with small 
leaves, lovely flowers, 
decorative fruits, and a 
pleasing pattern of 
branches in winter, for 
seasonal interest and 



character, should make up the well done 
front yard. The front lawn should be 
open and unobstructed to furnish a suit- 
able foreground for the house and to make 
maintenance easy. 

THE BACK YARD— Back yard areas 
should be enclosed; here the family should 
find it pleasant to rest, to entertain friends, 
and to garden. Hedges provide green 
walls which make ideal enclosures, and 
vines and shrubs trained on fences need 
even less room. The best place for flowers 
is in small beds inside these enclosures. 
LOCATING THE GARAGE— When 
the garage is not a part of the house it is 
best to place it so that the driveway is as 
short as possible. The idea of giving up a 
valuable strip of ground to a long drive is 
outmoded. Perhaps no other factor in 
laying out the home grounds so well 
justifies the studied landscape plan. 

* Extension Specialist in Landscape Gardeiung, 
Rutgers University. 





These dratcings, used by permission of Ladies 
Home Journal, show possibilities in developing 
lots oj simdar depth, and varying width. A 
slight increase in tvidth will sometimes provide 
an tinnsnal opportunity to a-eate a much more 
attractive and spacious design. The drawing on 
the right shows the formal or symmetrical latvn 
and giirden development. 



n 




VACATION BUDGETS 



DO you yearn every Spring for a 
cottage in the country or a camp 
at the shore? And do you go 
through that annual search for a "summer 
rental" cottage someone has advertised, 
wondering what you will get for your 
money, and perhaps wondering if you can 
afford the one that seems most attractive? 
Why not make the rent you pay each 
season to somebody else buy you a place of 
your very own? It is possible today to 
buy or build a cottage or camp, and to 
own it free and clear in five to seven years 
for what you probably pay out in that pe- 
riod for the place you rent each summer. 
Examine the litde table below. It tells 
what you can do under a special amend- 
ment to the National Housing Act passed 
in February, 1938. This amendment to 
Title I allows the Federal Housing Ad- 
ministration to insure a loan you can get 
from local bank or mortgage institution 
for any amount up to $2,500 for seven 
years at an exceptionally low interest rate, 
providing that loan is used to build a use- 
ful structure on land owned by the bor- 
ro\-\'er. A camp or cottage comes under 
this definition. And so also does a guest 
house, a tenant's cottage or farm build- 
ing, a garage, or even a wayside stand. 

16 



If you now pay $300 per season for a 
summer place you can build one costing 
$2,000 and pay for it in seven years, or 
one costing $1,500 that will be free and 
clear in five years. If your vacation bud- 
get allows as much as |600 for rent you can 
borrow the maximum of $2,500 for con- 
struction, and pay it all back in five years. 
Of course the monthly payments given in 
the table run all through the year for the 
duration of the loan; multiply any figure 
by 12 to find the equivalent total to com- 
pare with a season's rental. 

To get a loan under this plan you must 
own your land. The size of the lot de- 
pends on whether or not it is served by 
public water supply and sewerage systems; 
otherwise the lot size required may range 
from 4,000 square feet to 20,000 square 



Build a Summer Ilomc Out of 
Season Rental Costs 

Amoimt borrowed Jloiithly parnionts to repay entire 

to build your loan in — 

camii or cottago 
(not IncJ, land) 3 years 5 years 7 years 

SlOOO $30.65 S19.50 $14.73 

1500 45.97 29.25 22.09 

2000 61.29 39.01 29.46 

2500 76.61 48.76 36.82 



feet depending on conditions. There a 
also definite regulations governing the co 
struction of the building. ■'These are n 
unreasonable: they require sound co 
struction, good foundations, proper sar 
tary facilities — all desirable minimums th 
simply prevent erection of flimsy shacks 

IF your loan will be repaid within fi' 
years no security is required; yc 
merely sign a note. If the loan runs for 
longer period you may be required to gi', 
a mortgage as security, but this varies wit 
different types of lenders. The princip; 
requirement is that you have the ability 1 
meet the payments as they fall due. 

No down payments are required. Thej 
will be a small cost for appraisal and r 
cording fees, possibly a title examinatioj 
and your monthly payments will be ii 
creased over those shown in the tab.' 
enough to cover taxes and fire insurance. 

This is the lowest cost loan insured b 
FHA. Not all bankers will lend on the; 
terms because the return to them is so lov 
But it is worth your while to inquire c 
nearby banks and lending institutions, fc 
there is no better way to own the vacatio 
home you want, — this season if you desii 
• — without a major cash investment. 



SMALL HOME BUILDERS YEAR BOOK 1938-1939 EDITIO: 




THE FHA HOUSING PROGRAM 
Insured Mortgages for New Homes 

THE amendments to the National 
Housing Act of February, 1938, en- 
courage the construction of new 
homes by liberalizing the FHA-Insured 
Mortgage System. Chief features of the 
FHA Housing Program are: 

1. A small down-payment and a large 
percentage loan; 

2. A long repayment time, making peri- 
odic and costly refinancing unnecessary; 

3. Steady reduction of principal by con- 
venient monthly payments which include 
carrying charges and taxes; 

4. Investment safeguards — homes are 
appraised, plans approved and construc- 
tion inspected by FHA. 

FOUR CLASSES OF LOANS 

There are now four classes of loans for 
new one-family homes for owner occu- 
pancy, as follows: 

Title I Loans 

1. Small houses, summer cottages, farm 
buildings, etc., can be financed up to seven 
years by insured loans up to $2,500 with- 
out formal security such as a mortgage. 
The low interest rate (equivalent to 
$3,50 discount on each $100 borrowed) 
does not make such loans attractive to 
some bankers, and difficulty may be expe- 
rienced in finding an interested lender. 

Title II Loans 

2, For new construction appraised at 
$6,000 or less the applicant may borrow 



UNDER F. H. A. YOlJ CAN 
OWN TOUR OWN HOME NOW! 



up to 90% of the value of the completed 
property and may have 25 years to pay, 
provided the loan is insured before July 
1, 1939. After that the maturity is 20 
years. 

3. On properties valued at between 
$6,000 and $10,000 the first $6,000 is sub- 
ject to loan of 90%, or $5,400, and the 
balance to a loan of 80%. Such loans can 
run far 20 years, 

4. Properties having a sound value of 
from $10,000 to $20,000 may be mortgaged 
up to 80% for 20 years. 

The maximum loan which FHA will in- , 
sure is $16,000. 

HOW THE PLAN WORKS 

Table B, on page 20, shows how loans 
under the last three classes (all Tide II) 
are financed, and what is usually required 
from the applicant in the way of ready 
cash and income. It is based on the fol- 
lowing assumptions: A family can afford 
a house costing two times its steady an- 
nual income; it can spend around 20% 
of this income for rent; it can borrow from 
80 to 90% of the appraised value of the 
completed property; and beside the down 
payment or cash equity necessary it pos- 
sesses enough extra funds to pay all neces- 
sary financing costs. 

FINANCING CHARGES 

Service and financing charges which are 
provided for by the Act are: 

1. An FHA fee of $3 per $1,000 of loan 
for services of appraising, etc., payable 
when application is made. (Minimum 
charge $10.) 

Permissible charges by the lender in- 
clude: 

2. The first annual premium charge for 
mortgage insurance, plus one-twelfth. This 
runs from $2.29 to $4.93 per $1,000 loan. 

3. Cost of title search, usually not less than 
$75, sometimes considerably more, This 
is not always necessary. 



4. Fees for recording the mortgage, aver- 
aging from $7.50 to $10. 

5. An appraisal fee running from $15 to 
$25. 

6. An initial service fee for inspecting con- 
struction and for funds advanced before 
the project is completed. This varies, ac- 
cording to the service rendered, from 1% 
to 2 Yz % of the mortgage with minimums 
of $20 to 



•••••••••■ 

* 

5f 




WHAT IS THE 
NATIONAL HOUSING AQT? 

The NATIONAL HOUSING 
ACT is the law under which 
the FEDERAL HOUSING AD- 
MINISTRATION, commonly 
known as FHA, operates. 

FHA does NOT lend money. 

FHA investigates and ap- 
proves lending institutions and 
cooperates with them by INSUR- 
ING these lenders against RISKS 
of long-term low-rate loans for 
Home Building and for Home 
Repairs, Improvements and Ad- 
ditions. 

The two principal parts of the 
ACT that concern individual 
Home Builders or Owners are 
called TITLE I and TITLE II. 

TITLE I covers PROPERTY 
IMPROVEMENT and MOD- 
ERNIZATION LOANS and also 
HOME LOANS in the LOW- 
EST COST Class. 

TITLE II covers NEW HOME 
LOANS, up to $16,000, made on 
property that meets desirable 
standards of design, location and 
construction. 






THE WISDOM OF HOME-OWNERSHIP 

There are satisfactions in Home-Ownership that cannot be val- 
ued in dollars and cents. You may tie up capital in a house 
that might earn more money in stocks and bonds, but you will 
rarely get from such an investment comparable values in sta- 
bility, pride of possession and protection in times of stress. 

Of course there are risks in Home-Ownership. The principal 
one is the resale value, which depends both on the market and 
on your judgment in choosing a house that will always be 
readily saleable. While no one can foretell the state of the real 
estate market, you can protect your investment by selecting a 
home that has popular appeal, and by keeping it in good con- 
dition. Seldom can an investor in securities so easily protect 
and insure the future value of his holdings. 

The first essential is a good design— architectural good tnste 
and attractive grounds. Second is a good plan— one that meets 
the needs of the average family and is functionally suited to 
modern living. Third is individuality and character without 
freakishness. These will assure a quick sale at a good price. 

When the principles of good design, sound financing and 
quality construction are observed Home-Ownership is a safe 
investment— and it costs less than paying rent. 




See Page 64 for Details $500 Prize Letter Contest 



^ 

^ 



HOW TO «ET A 




n.^iix& 



lJi.r 



i 



(icia^ 



HERE, simply stated, is what to do. 
1. Choose the Plot and Plan 
you want. 

2. Get a preliminary estimate from a 
competent Builder covering all costs for 
the improvements. 

3. Ask a Bank or Building and Loan 
Association to lend you the amount of 
money you need in order to build. 

4. The Lender then calls in FHA to 
study and approve your plans. 

5. The Lender, insured, then lends you 
the money you need. 

FHA Approvaf 

FHA approval is given if 

A. Your income is steady and large 
enough; 

B. Your credit is good — that is, you are 
able to meet your obligations as they be- 
come due; 

C. Your house meets certain minimum 
standards. 

FHA Standards 

These standards are 

A. The design must be architecturally 
attractive, readily saleable; 

B. The construction must be sound, re- 
sisting weather and wear and tear; 

C. The plan must be practical and liv- 
able — not inconvenient or extreme; 

D. The equipment must be suited to 
the house and the neighborhood. 

FHA does not like loans on new houses 
in rundown neighborhoods or in the path 
of future business or manufacturing. 

FHA recommends building in residen- 
tial areas, with good transportation, near 
good schools and other civic centers. 

FHA likes to see new houses located in 
sections where values are equal and designs 
harmonious. Mixing architectural styles, 
or locating inexpensive houses in expen- 
sive neighborhoods, always lowers values. 

FHA and the lender have only one way 
to appraise a house — its quick resale value, 
and it is this value plus your personal rat- 
ing on which the loan is made. 

FHA Appraisals 

When you ask a bank for a mortgage 
[and it turns to FHA to ask if it will insure 
Jyour loan, FHA makes a careful and com- 
alete check on three vital points. 
House 

Architectural Examiner studies your 

land specifications to see if the plan 

:tical, the construction of suitable 



quality throughout, and the design attrac- 
tive and in good taste. 
2. The Site 

A Valuator looks over the site and the 
neighborhood to see whether you have 
picked an acceptable piece of land; one 
that is physically appropriate for the house 
you plan to build. He also examines the 
character of the neighborhood and the 
houses in it, to be sure, among other 
things, that the district is not already ob- 
solete; that store, schools, churches, are 
reasonably near; that there is good trans- 
portation; that there are such conveniences 
as water supply, sewer, electricity, gas, and 
public roads; that the tax rate is not too 
high, with no special assessments to come 
that will cause financial difficulties. 

Appraised Value 

Both the Architectural Examiner and 
the Valuator then appraise the true value 
of your property as it will be with the im- 
provements for which the loan has been 
asked. And it is on this appraised value 
— not what you propose to spend on the 
property — that the bank loans you money. 

For instance, you might want to build 
on a rocky slope where the cost of excavat- 
ing for the foundation would be as much 
as the cost of the house. If you wanted to 
sell quickly, it would be difficult to find 
anyone who would pay these extra costs 
for a house on such a steep lot. Probably 
you would be fortunate to get back the 
cost of the house alone. 

Mortgage Risk Examiner 

And while all this is going on, a Mort- 
gage Risk Examiner is busily checking up 
on you by examining five points: Your 
social and credit standing; why you want 
to buy or build a house; your ability to get 
and hold a job; your present indebtedness; 
and the amount of your income and its 
relation to what you want to invest in your 
new property. 

All these reports go to the Chief Under- 
writer who makes a final rating that tells 
whether or not the mortgage will be in- 
sured by FHA. In ten days to two weeks 
you should know whether your application 
is accepted or rejected by the bank. 

In either event, there is reason for satis- 
faction. If your application is rejected you 
know that your investment would have 
been risky. If your application is accepted 
you can be proud that you and your project 
are economically sound. 



Jd TtVi.. and. Wjul. 

Prospective 
Home Owner 



NATIONAL SMALL HOMES 

BUREAU, INC. 

wants to help you get the 

HOME YOU WANT 

We urge you to use our serv- 
ices freely. 

Gladly 
Will We 

1. Ansv7er questions on all 
phases of home-making. 

2. Get for you literature on 
any Tp^oducis in which you are 
interested. 

PLEASE USE THE 

COUPON ON PAGE 64 

for Booklets About the 

Products of 
OUR ADVERTISERS 

3. Put you in touch with reli- 
able PLAN SERVICES that 
have good SMALL HOUSE 
PLANS. 

4. Give you the names of 
Builders, Lumber Dealers and 
Building Supply Dealers near 
you where you can examine 
plans and discuss details with 
experienced people. 

5. Send you a list of Financial 
Institutions near you, ap- 
proved by FHA, if there is 
none in your town. 

6. Send you a list of Financial 
Institutions, near you, operat- 
ing under the Federal Home 
Building Service Plan. 

7. Tell you the names of archi- 
tects in your vicinity who are 
experienced in Small Home 
design. 

Just Write Us cil 

572 Madison Avenue 

New York, N. Y. 



BE SURE TO ENTER THE 

$500 PRIZE 
LETTER CONTEST 

SEE PAGE 64 



HOME BUILDERS YEAR BOOK — 1938-1939 EDITION 



19 




'Civ 




nek 



HOW TO USE THIS CHART 

Analyze your Income and Savings as sug- 
gested on the opposite page. 
Write your Steady Monthly Income in space 
indicated. 

Write your Present Monthl)- Rent in space in- 
dicated. 

Nofe 1: li this now includes operating ex- 
penses like heat, water, electricity, etc., deduct 
their cost if known or take off 15 per cent to 
estimate amount paid for shelter only. 
Note 2: If not a rent payer, find the per- 
centage of your income you should normally 
allow for rent in TABLE A and multiply your 
income by this. Local differences make Table 
A useful only for preliminary estimates. Ac- 
tual figures, based on studies by U. S. Bureau 
of Labor Statistics, are available for 32 cities. 
National Small Homes Bureau will be glad 
to supply data. 

On Line 1 of TABLE B find figure nearest 
to your rent. Below on line 4 j'ou will find 
how much house and lot you can afford to 
own for the RENT YOU ARE NOW PAY- 
ING. 

On Lines 2 and 3 you will find how much 
READY CASH you need to get this house. 



Table A 


Yearly Income 


% for Rent 


$1,000 to $1,499 


20 


11,500 to $1,999 


18 


$2,000 to $2,999 


i 16 


$3,000 and over 


15 



TABLE B— HOW MUCH HOUSE FOR YOUR PRESENT RENT 


1. 


If You Are NOW Paying a 
Monthly Rent of: 


$15 


$20 


$25 


$30 


$35 


$40 


$45 


$50 


$60 


$70 


$80 


$90 


$100 


2. 


And Have CASH, or LAND 
Worth: 


190 


250 


315 


370 


435 


490 


560 


600 


800 


1000 


1250 


1400 


2400 


3. 


And, To Meet Costs Of Title 
Search, Recording Fees, etc., 
have, as ADDITIONAL 
CASH: 


140 


150 


170 


185 


200 


215 


225 


240 


270 


285 


310 


340 


370 


4. 


You can Have a House and 
Lot VALUED at: 


1890 


2450 


3115 


3670 


4335 


4890 


5560 


6000 


7000 


8000 


9250 


10,000 


12,000 


5. 


By Borrowing from Your 
Bank, 

or, of the Total Appraised 
Value: 


1700 


2200 


2800 


3300 


3900 


4400 


5000 


5400 


6200 


7000 


8000 


8600 


9600 


90% 


90% of first $6,000 
80% of balance 


80% 


6. 


And You Can PAY OFF this 
Loan in up to: 


TWENTY-FIVE YEARS 


TWENTY YEARS 



The data in the above Table are Approximations based on assumptions of Typical Conditions, However, as Local Taxes In- ^^ 
surance Rates, Costs of Title Search and similar expenses show wide variations in different localities, it should be understood 'that 
the figures present a picture of HOW National Housing Act (FHA) financing works, and A^OT a statement of actual financing. 



20 



SMALL HOME BUILDERS YEAR BOOK 1938-1939 EDITION 



r 




^CH^C CAN YOU AFFORD? 



The man who builds, and wants wherewith to pay, 
Provides a home from which to run away. 

Edward Young (16834765) 



IT is easy to work out a sound plan for 
financing the home you desire. The 
chart and table on the opposite page 
eliminate all difficult figuring. 

Two things determine how valuable a 
property a family can safely afford: its 
savings in cash (a part of this may be in 
the value of land already owned) and its 
steady income. Both must be considered; 
each has a limiting effect on the other. 

Modern financing methods are based 
largely on the borrower's'ability to pay for 
the loan within the time agreed upon. 
These payments must be made regularly, 
usually every month. They include inter- 
est on the money borrowed, taxes and in- 
surance on the property and an amount 
that will pay off the amount borrowed. 

If the family has been renting a home, 
and has found that it can live within its 
means while paying its present rent, it is 
obviously possible to spend the same rent 
money for the purchase of a home. In 
fact, if that family is also able to save a 
little in addition, part of these savings can 
be turned into home ownership, for a home 
is a financial safeguard somewhat like a 
bank account. 

Of course, what the present rent covers 
is important. If it is for a heated apart- 
ment and includes light, water and similar 
operating expenses that are not included 
when one rents a single house, the present 
rent must be divided and only that part 
counted which pays for the shelter itself. 
This may be done by estimating what it 
costs to provide heat, power, water and 
similar services; but as this is often difficult, 
it will usually be safe to take off 15 per 
cent of the present rent and count the rest 
as being what one would pay for a house. 

This "net" rental should be entered in 
the chart. If you want to check your en- 
tire budget, or if you do not have enough 
data to estimate your rent allowance in the 
manner suggested, the chart provides for a 
complete analysis of your monthly income, 
starting at the top of the page. However, 
this "breakdown" of your monthly income 
is not necessary; the net rental figure is all 
that you need. 

If you have not been paying rent or have 
Uo other means of determining what you 
afford to pay monthly for a home, the 



figures in TABLE A may help. They show 
national average expenditures for shelter 
in different income classes. These vary 
widely in different sections and at best are 
only to be used for rough estimates. 

Once the safe monthly payinent has been 
determined it may be applied to TABLE 
B, by finding on the first line the figure 
near this amount. The TABLE should 
then be read down. 

Line 3 shows how valuable a property 
that monthly payment will finance safely, 
if other factors are satisfactory. As a check, 
Line 6 will show approximately what total 
income the family should have (based on 
the theory that the average family can own 
a house worth twice its income). This is 
a conservative check; the total value may 
sometimes exceed this amount. 

The other controlling factor, cash, must 
now be considered. No banker will as- 
sume all the risks of home ownership for 
others. The borrower must have demon- 
strated his ability to save and to live within 
his income by having some cash or its 
equivalent. He must be ready to take at 
least as much risk as the lender. 

Cash must be available for two purposes. 
The first is for the down payment or the 
owner's "equity" in the property. This 
may be land instead of cash if the site is 
acceptable to the FHA or the lender as 
suited to the house to be built. 

The second is to meet financing costs at 
the start, as explained in detail on page 17. 
The latter are expenses that do not add to 
the value of the property like the former; 
they cannot be included in the amount to 
be borrowed. 

Now TABLE B can be used again. Line 
2 shows how much cash, or its equivalent 
in land, must be available to the borrower 
as his share in the venture at the start. 
Line 7 shows approximately how much 
additional ready cash is needed for pre- 
liminary expenses and financing charges. 
Line 4 shows the approximate amount that 
can be borrowed and Line 5 the maximum 
number of years the loan may run. 

Other factors that cannot be tabulated 
may enter the problem, but the use of this 
table will serve as a guide in estimating 
the value of a property which a family can 
afford to own. The lender will want to 




:all home builders year book — 1938-1939 edition 



Courtesy of United Slates Builditig and Loan League 



House on which first loan was placed in 
1831 by first Savings, Building and Loan 
Ass'n in United States. The purchaser 
borrowed $375 and paid back $3 a month 
to include principal and interest. 

make reasonably certain that the family's 
present income will continue during the 
life of the loan. A young family, with 
good prospects, may be allowed the maxi- 
mum time of 20 to 25 years, but a man of 
middle age whose earning power may 
cease in 10 or 15 years, will be required to 
make larger payments in order to retire the 
loan out of his assured earnings. 

Good sense dictates that not all df the 
family's available reserves should be 
pledged for the acquisition of a home. 
There is always need for a nest egg in case 
of sickness or other emergencies. If one 
is building, rather than buying at a fixed 
price, there is a chance that unforeseen 
extra costs will be encountered. There is 
the expense of moving to allow for, and 
in all probability there will be need for 
new furniture, rugs, draperies and other 
fitments to make the new home attractive. 
The construction contract itself may not 
include everything; very often grading, 
planting, driveways, hardware, lighting 
fixtures, screens, shades, storm sash, awn- 
ings and similar finishing touches are left 
out, for the owner to supply without pay- 
ing the general contractor a profit for han- 
dling them. 

The logical thing to do, of course, is to 
make up a careful budget of every possible 
expense that can be anticipated. After the 
essential reserves are set aside, the amount 
left can safely be applied to the down pay- 
ment or equity. With such reasonable 
foresight, the home-owning venture is 
bound to be safe and wholly enjoyable. 

21 



^yie <:=LyeJietciL ^;^::/^am.e 




ii/ia 



SERVICE PLAN 



ONE of the most important govern- 
mental agencies working for the 
benefit of small-home builders, 
seeking to help them get maximum loans 
from lending institutions, is the Federal 
Home Loan Bank Board. It has devel- 
oped a building service plan which has 
many features of interest to anyone who is 
planning to build. 

The Federal Home Building Service 
Plan was developed to assure the small- 
home seeker a good building and a well- 
protected investment. It is the result of the 
experience of the Home Owners' Loan 
Corporation, which fou^d, as the result of 
its operations to refinance mortgages in 
danger of foreclosure, that shoddy con- 
struction forced it to recondition nearly 
half of the million homes it sought to save 
in order to make them good security. 
Aroused to the evils of such construction, 
the Board sought to link all elements of 
the industry to eliminate such practices. 

At the same time the Board felt such a 
plan was essential to protect both the lend- 
ing institutions of its Federal Home Loan 
Bank System and the HOLC, which has 
over S200,000,000 invested in shares of 
those institutions. With low interest rates 
and amortization loans being granted for 
15 and 20 years, sound and unquestionable 
security was an obvious necessity. 

Complete Service in One Package 

Under the PLAN, the most important 
feature of which is that lending institutions 
and architects are joined together to give 
small-home builders services ordinarily 
available only to persons of ample means, 
the home-buyer, instead of being forced to 
"shop" for wares in a market with which 
he is unfamiliar, is now offered, in ONE 
PACKAGE 

Sound financial counsel; 

The largest loan and most liberal terms 
consistent with his resources and credit; 

Competent architectural aid in design- 
ing his home; 

A structure suitable to his family needs, 
his building site and his neighborhood; 

A properly qualified contractor; 

Specifications listing proper materials 
and a careful check on .those materials; 

Competent supervision of construction; 

A Federal Certificate of Registration, 
stating that his home has been built under 
the Plan, thus increasing investment secu- 
rity and resale value. 



Houses for Resale 

The PLAN is available for builders' of 
houses for sale, of course, as well as for the 
individual home builder. 

A Local Enterprise 

The PLAN is essentially a local enter- 
prise, financed and directed by local capi- 
tal. Only approval of lending institutions, 
architects, and of house plans is under the 
jurisdiction of either the 12 Regional 
Banks or the Bank Board in Washington. 
360 Small Home Designs 

Of the nearly 4,000 member institutions 
of the Federal Home Loan Bank System, 
at present over 170 institutions, in 53 dif- 
ferent communities, have been approved, 
and over 250 architects have enlisted in the 
program. More than S60 small home de- 
signs, all of acknowledged merit, are avail- 
able, and more are being added steadily. 
FHA Insured Loans 

The PLAN is in use by institutions 
which make loans insured by the Federal 
Housing Administration, but otherwise 
there is no connection between the Federal 
Home Loan Bank Board and FHA. It 
should be clearly understood that the mem- 
ber institutions of the Ban\ System mal^e 
loans to individuals for the building of 
homes. FHA only insures loans; it does 
not make any itself. Nor is there any con- 
nection between the savings and loan asso- 
ciations which are members of the Bank 
System and national mortgage companies. 
Liberal Loans at Lov/ Rates 

All members of the Bank System make 
liberal loans at low interest rates, the size 
of which, compared to the appraised value 
of properties on which they are made, de- 
pends on the charters of the lending insti- 
tutions. For instance, federal-chartered in- 
stitutions are allowed to make 90% loans 
if insured by FHA, and if their sharehold- 
ers conform to rules laid down by the 
Board. State-chartered Institutions which 
are members of the Bank System must, 
however, also conform to their charters. 




«I(II1I(I|III IISKI 



sariirisi» ctiisiiiciii' 



Plan Benefits Entire Industry 

Although the PLAN has as its basic ob- 
jectives protection for the small home 
builder and safeguards for lending insti- 
tutions and their Investors, obviously its 
benefits apply equally to all factors of the 
building industry. Architects are able to 
provide designs and supervision at modi- 
fied fees which are included in construc- 
tion costs. Insistence upon the use of qual- 
ity materials and high standards of con- 
struction increase the market for respon- 
sible building supply dealers and for repu- 
table builders and contractors. Economies 
in construction methods more than com- 
pensate the home owner for the technical 
fees included In construction costs. 

Endorsed by A. I. A. 
The Plan has the endorsement of the 
Directors of the American Institute of Ar- 
chitects, for it provides a means whereby 
the architect, whose service and experience 
is recognized as invaluable to the ,small 
home builder, is brought into the small 
home field on a mutually beneficial basis. 

To Get This Service 
To avail yourself of this service, go first 
to a local loan association which is a mem- 
ber of the Bank System. There ypn will 
find a supply of home designs, either 
drawn by local architects or specifically 
chosen because of their adaptability to your 
community — in no sense the old stock 
plans. Selected architects will alter them, 
if necessary, to your needs and desires. - 

If, however, you have a plan of your 
own, it will be examined and you will be 
told if it complies with the standards un- 
der which the lending institution is willing 
to finance you. In either ease, you will be 
provided with the necessary technical as- 
sistance, aid in getting estimates from com- 
petent contractors and other helps which 
will assure you the largest possible loan. 
Supervision Assures Quality 
Once construction is started, an archi- 
tect will supervise the work, seeing that I 
specifications are carried out, that good ma- 
terials are used and properly installed. 
Thus you have assurance, as far as possible, 
that you are getting the home you are pay- 
ing for — a home which Is a sound invest- 
ment and which, because of good design 
and construction, will keep your mainte- 
nance cost at a minimum during the years 
you are amortizing your loan. 



22 



SMALL HOME BUILDERS YEAR BOOK — 1938-1939 EDITION 



I 






GOOD BUILDERS FOR GOOD HOUSES 

Now that you have decided the kind of house you want and 
how you are going to pay for it, the next thing is to make 
sure that it will be well built of materials that are suited to each 
other and that will withstand the ravages of wind and weather. 

In this age of scientific investigation and proving of materials 
you can use the trade-marked products of manufacturers of 
national reputation with confidence that they are every bit as 
good as represented. 

You should, of course, choose with care. In so doing you will 
need advice, for the layman does not know the fine points about 
lumber, paint^ insulation, roofing, window glass, etc. Nor can 
he know how materials are properly fitted together. The fact 
that you have good insulation does not mean that your heating 
bill will be low. It all depends upon installation. Talk with, 
and heed, your lumber or building material dealer, or your 
architect. They know. 

Your house will be only as good as your builder. His stand- 
ing in your community is based on his knowledge of adequate 
construction and quality materials— 720/ low estimates. The day 
of the jerry-builder is past. 




See Page 64 for Details $500 Prize Letter Contest 



J-ke <:zyi4.n.Jii 



(rti^en.lci 



tal <z::>^n^at.e(iun.u 



1 



OF THE WELL-BUILT HOUSE 



MOST people define their ideal 
house in terms of its principal 
exterior materials: a red brick 
house with a slate roof, for example, or a 
white shingled house, or a stucco house. 
Thus they reveal their inherent love for 
some particular type of construction — a 
type, no doubt, that recalls some earlier 
environment or some particularly delight- 
ful home they would like to reproduce. 

It is fortunate that there is no question 
about the worth of these many favored 
construction materials. All of them make 
a good house, if properly employed; the 
choice between them depends on prefer- 
ence, budgets and fitness to the style. 

But each material used in building con- 
struction has its own characteristics, advan- 
tages and limitations. No one material is 
perfect under all conditions, nevertheless 
for each condition of design, pocketbook 
or locality there is always one material that 
is best suited to the job. The task of the 
architect or owner is to choose what is 
best for his particular project. 

It may seem almost a hopeless task to 
choose wisely among the vast number of 
traditional and new materials now avail- 
able for homes. To simplify this task there 
is summarized in this article some of the 
more important things to think about 
when choosing materials for various parts 
of the structure. 

Basement 

Foundation walls should be built of 
whatever material has locally proven satis- 
factory in view of soil conditions (wet or 
dry), strength, cost and good appearance. 
Today appearance of the interior surfaces 
becomes important because basements are 
made useful for recreation and hobby 
rooms. The cellar floor should be water- 
proofed and hardened for the same reason. 

Termite Protection 

Wherever termite infestations have ap- 
peared it is wise to take precautions against 
their entrance into a new house. All wood 
members should be kept 8" above the 
ground level. A copper or lead, shield on 
top of the foundation walls, protruding A" 
out on either side, is usually effective. 
Timber in sills and first-floor joists may 
be treated before installation to make it 
resistant to both termites and decay. 




Copper & Brass Eesearcli Ass'u. 

Installing a copper fermite shield. The light 

streak on the right shows the projecting lip that 

insects cannot pass. 

Exterior Walls 

Flere the choice is largely governed by 
personal preference, style and cost. Valu- 
able pointers on wood frame construction 
are gh'en in a separate article on page 31. 

When masonry construction is desired, 
the first choice to be made is between a 
veneer of masonry over a wood frame and 
solid masonry — the latter term including 
all-masonr)' walls of hollow type. Veneers* 
of brick, cut stone and stucco are practical 
if the wood frame is of "balloon" construc- 
tion as described elsewhere in more deatil. 
With solid masonry it is wise to make cer- 
tain that the interior "bearing partitions" 
on which the floors rest are designed for 
minimum shrinkage. Modern steel joists 
used with solid masonry walls make an ex- 
cellent rigid and firesafe construction. 




Hudson 
Flemish 



River 
bond 



Brick JIfi-3. 

common brick la 
with broken he 
rugged texture. 



Ass'n, of New Toili 

lid on edge in 
iders make a 



Brick masonry may be of brick through- 
out or with a facing of brick bonded to a 
backing of structural clay tile. Stone is 
difficult to use unless there is a local form 
which lays up well and has the right scale 
and texture for the style of the house. 
Stucco is in itself a veneer; it may be ap- 
plied to metal lath on a wood frame, or bet- 
ter (because all masonry) on scored struc- 
tural clay tile or some form of cement 
block or solid concrete. 

Cinder concrete masonry units in the 
new "ashlar" forms make a decorative, 
stone-like wall of good structural value. 
Walls of solid concrete, though excellent 
for foundations, are not used generally for 
small houses because they arc unnecessarily 
strong and massive. 




SMALL HOME BUILDERS YEAR B O O K — 1 9 3 8 - 1 9 3 9 EDITION 



Portland Cement Ass'n. 
Varied sizes of cin- 
der concrete block 
form attractive pat- 
terns. Top — Un- 
coursed ashlar. Left 
— Coursed ashlar. 



All exterior walls, whether of wood or 
masonry, should be insulated with appro- 
priate insulating materials. It is a popular 
but erroneous belief that masonry walls are 
warmer in winter and cooler in summer 
than wood walls. Often the reverse is true. 

Insulation is discussed in a separate arti- 
cle (Page 36) because of its importance. 

Roofs 

Again the choice of materials may be 
governed by preference as much as by 
style and cost. Wood shingles hold top 
place in preference and use because they 
combine beauty, low cost and, when period- 
ically treated, have longer life and greater 
fire safety than is generally appreciated. 
Slate and burned clay tile are other stand- 
bys that have stood the test of centuries. 

Among the newer materials asphalt 
shingles lead in the low-cost, medium-life 
group and asbestos-cement shingles in the 
medium-cost, long-life group. Both types 
have been notably improved in texture, de- 
sign and color in recent years. 

25 



It Is also worth noting here that manu- 
facturers of these materials have developed 
sidings — for house exteriors — that have to 
recommend them attractive colors, designs, 
and textures, reasonable permanency, and 
low first costs. 

Metal roofing, particularly the sheet 
metal kind with "standing*' seams care- 
fully spaced down the slope of the roof, 
has long precedent behind it and is grow- 
ing in popularity. Copper is made in two 
weights, 10 oz. and 16 oz. for medium and 
long life at proportionate costs. Zinc is 
used in the same manner, while the low- 
cost tin and galvanized-iron (zinc-coated) 
roofs of this type seem to stand up well in 
rural areas remote from the acid fumes of 
cities and manufacturing plants. 

Windows 

Perhaps no more^ important decision 
must be made than the choice of windows. 
The trend among designers today is to use 
windows more intelligently than in the 
past, increasing their size and number and 
locating them with more care in relation 
to furniture placement indoors and outlook 
from rooms. Modern science knows that 




A pleasing combination of thick buH asphalf 
roofing shingles and waveline asbestos siding. 

windows should be planned for double 
glazing in winter to reduce heat loss and 
dri^fts. It knows that weatherstripping is 



worth far more than it costs in fuel sav- 
ings and freedom from dust and drafts all 
year around. Designers know that full- 
length screens are essential in almost every 
part of the United States. And so mod- 
ern windows have been vastly improved to 
provide these essentials. 

Advances in double-hung windows (that 
slide up and down) include spring bal- 
ances, flat weights, and various friction de- 
vices all designed to save large frames and 
permit the use of narrow trim, inside and 
out. The better grade windows come all 
equipped with efficient weatherstripping, 
and with provision for full length storm 
sash and screens. 

Casement windows in both wood and 
metal are now made with interchangeable 
winter storm sash and summer screens and 
with integral weatherstripping. 

Combine these improvements with mod- 
ern flat, high-clarity window glass and the 
new types of window hardware and it be- 
comes evident that the home owner of 
today can have much more charming and 
satisfactory eyes for his house than were 
available in the past. To say nothing of 



copper-Seal Your Hon,e 
weep ool wind and mojsf^^;;^ 



Cooler in Summer 
Fuel Saver in Winter 



Anaconda "Electro-Sheet" is pure, 
paper-thin copper. In long rolls, 30 
inches wide, it is used in place of 
building paper to seal walls, founda- 
tions and roofs against wind and 
moisture. Non-porous, rust-proof, 
strong and durable, "Electto-Sheet" 
is moderately priced and easy to in- 
stall. Furnished in two weights . . . 
1-02. per sq. ft. (.0013" in thick- 
ness), or 2-02. per sq. ft. (.0027" in 
thickness).. ."Electro-Sheet" is avail- 
able either plain, or bonded 
to the best known standard f\ ha 

brands of building paper. ^NAtW^DA an 



Use Anaconda "Electro-Sheet" Cop- 
per to seal out the weather. It will 
make your home cooler and more 
comfortable in summer, and easier 
to heat in winter. 



Free Booklet for You 

Anaconda "Electro-Sheet" Copper, 
and other durable money-saving 
Anaconda Products such as copper 
water tubes, copper for roof flash- 
ings and gutters, copper for termite- 
proofing, bronze wire for screens, 
etc., are briefly and interestingly de- 
scribed in our free booklet, "Portrait 
afa Rust-proofed Home. " Anyone plan- 
ning to build or buy should 
have a copy. Simply fill out 
d mail coupon opposite. 



THE AMERICAN BRASS COMPANY . General Offices: Waterbury, Conn 
Subsidiary of ANACONDA COPPER MINING COMPANY 




26 



SMALL HOME BUILDERS YEAR BOOK 1938-1939 EDITION 




Libbey-Owens-Fmd Glass Co. 

Bringing the outside in. A beautiful expanse of 
gleaming polished plate glass captures an out- 
door scene and makes it a marching mural 
painting. 

the possibilities that lie in picture windows, 
flower windows, bay windows and other 
decorative and architectural features! 

Doors 

Three new developments in doors are 
worth special mention. First is the intro- 
duction of stock doors and doorways de- 
signed by leading architects that offer the 
quality of fine custom work at stock mill 
prices. Second is the rather recent devel- 
opment of low cost "flush" doors of light, 
hollow construction. These have great 
decorative quality through their very simp- 
plicity; they are adapted to modern as well 
as period styles. The third is the produc- 
tion of doors with interchangeable panels 
that become screen doors in summer and 
glass-paneled storm doors in winter. 

Glass Block 
While on the subject of openings in 
walls, thought should be given to the pos- 
sibilities inherent in glass block. They 
form translucent wails that are weather- 
tight, self-insulated and of high decorative 
and illuminating quality. They do not 
take the place of windows for they provide 
neither ventilation nor outlook, but they 
can be used structurally to admit light at 
places where a window would not be ap- 
propriate. Imagine, for example, a base- 
ment play room lighted largely by founda- 
tions made of glass block between load- 
carrying piers of solid masonry. 

Electrical Work 

It is for your safety that building depart- 
ments and insurance companies insist that 
the installation of all electrical work and 
equipment must comply with the National 
Electrical Code, with local laws, and the 
regulations of the local electric company. 
All materials must be new and approved 
by Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc. This 
organization, sponsored by the insurance 
companies, is the recognized authority on 
electrical materials. Its standards are ob- 
served by reputable manufacturers. 

The home wiring system should have 
sufficient capacity to handle future increases 
of current to meet the demands of more 
electrical appliances or illumination. This 



means (1) a service entrance of sufficient 
capacity for such a wiring system; (2) an 
adequate number of branch circuits of 
large enough wire to deliver full power to 
every outlet; (3) an adequate number of 
outlets for lamps and appliances; and (4) 
enough switches properly placed for safe 
control of lighting. (See page 40.) 

Caulking and Flashings 

Every opening in outside walls, and 
every break of any sort in the continuity 
of the exterior surfaces of a house present 
potential weak spots through which wind 
and rain may enter. To prevent air leak- 
age around door and window frames these 
joints should be caulked with a suitable 
plastic compound forced into the cracks. 
Caulking does for frames what weather- 
stripping does for movable sash and doors. 

Flashings are strips of waterproof mate- 
rial, usually a durable metal like copper 
or lead, inserted in vertical walls to help 
shed water around openings and at inter- 
sections with any horizontal or sloping 
surface. They are needed over window 
and door-openings, where chimneys join 
gable epds or project through roofs, and 
where porches and wings join the main 
walls. Similar strips of metal are needed 
in the valleys where two roof slopes meet, 
at the eaves, and wherever water, ice or 
snow collect. On these depends the weath- 
er-lightness of a house. 

Interior Finishes 
Indoors the first decision to be made 
relates to the materials to be used on walls 
and ceilings. Shall it be plaster, one of 
the many new types of wall board, some 
special sound absorbent product (particu- 
larly for ceilings), plywood, or some form 
of plank or wood paneling? This choice, 
in turn, is governed by the surface decora- 
tion desired: paint, wall paper, wall fabrics, 
wall linoleum, textured plaster or natural 
or stained wood. To a large extent these 
decisions influence the remaining choice of 
flooring and trim. 

Plaster and Lath 

The unique advantage of plaster which 
is not possessed by other finishing mate- 
rials lies in its ability to provide a smooth 
straight wall or ceiling over an irregular 
base. All finishes which are applied in 
sheets of uniform thickness must have a 
true foundation of evenly aligned studs or 
joists, as they will reveal on the surface any 
irregularities beneath. 

Plaster has little strength in itself; it de- 
pends upon a rigid structure and a firm, 
secure base. Wood lath is traditional and, 
properly installed and covered, offers lon- 
gevity, sturdiness, and surprising fire-resist- 
ance. Metal lath and wire lath both tend 



How To Use 

SMALL HOME 

BUILDERS' 

YEAR BOOK 



Read all the articles in this 
book. They were written by 
authorities. Study the adver- 
tisements. They tell the story 
of the modern home. 

Then, with the Year Book 
under your arm 

— Talk it over with your local 
Lumber or Building Supply 
Dealer. They know Materials. 

— Consult your Gas and Elec- 
tric Company. Their engi- 
neers know Equipment. 

— Study the Furniture and 
Decorations in your local 
stores, and heed the advice 
of their Experts. 

— Look over all the Plan 
Books you can find for ideas 
about economicaJ and efti- 
cient floor plans. (There is a 
list of Plan Services on Page 
8.) 

— Tell your architect about 
your Dream House and gef 
his suggestions about design 
and plan. 

— Ask the local Chamber of 
Commerce about the char- 
acter and future of the neigh- 
borhood in which you think 
of building. (See Page 5.) 

— Confer with your Banker or 
Building and Loan Associa- 
tion about financing. (See 
Pages 17-22.) 



USE THE COUPON ON PAGE 64 

Send us any questions about any de- 
tail of homemaking from Finance to 
Furnishing, 

NATIONAL SMALL 
HOMES BUREAU, INC, 

572 Madison Avenue, New York 



Be Sure to Enter the $500.00 

Prize Letter Contest! 

See Page 64 



SMALL HOME BUILDERS YEAR BOOK — 1938-1939 EDITION 



27 



il 




I 



CORINCO 

quiet, 
non-skid 



The resilient and yet architec- 
turally beautiful flooring for the 
home — 

Made of new pure cork without 
the addition of binder or filler or 
any foreign §,ubstance of any na- 
ture whatever. 

Investigate Corinco High Den- 
sity Cork Flooring for your home. 
Learn of its unlimited pattern pos- 
sibilities, from the simplest floor 
consisting of iVi" or 1>" strips to 
any design desired. Learn of the 
floor (Corinco) that takes Corinco 
Permanent Finish that will oudast 
any finished floor at present on the 
market, and always retain its new, 
fresh appearance. The floor that 
has the shades of oak or walnut as 
desired, with a beautiful granular 
structure and yet can be washed 
daily with water and a mop with- 
out injury. 

Our Designing and Advisory 

Departments are at 

your service. 

Write for Circular S-H 100 



Cork Insulation Co., 

Inc. 

155 East 44th Street 

New York, N. Y. 

Or your flooring contractor 

CORINCO HIGH 
DENSITY CORK 
FLOORING 



to reinforce the plaster by becoming em- 
bedded in it. Gypsum laths, with or with- 
out perforations through which the plaster 
is pressed to form a "key" are stiff and 
save some thickness in the plaster itself. 
Fibrous insulating boards made as plaster 
bases combine insulation value with a sup- 
port for plaster in one product. The choice 
between these various bases should be 
made or confirmed by an expert familiar 
with the project. 

Plaster is usually the preferred mate- 
rial if walls are to be papered or painted, 
especially if the structural walls are not 
perfecdy true. Similar effects can be ob- 
tained with modern plaster boards applied 
with special reinforcing tapes that conceal 
the joints and leave a smooth surface. 

Wall Boards 



are available in almost endless variety. 
They are made of asbestos-cement for hard 
tile-like or marble-like finishes, of fibrous 
insulating materials for softer and often 
interestingly textured effects, and of gyp- 
sum in tile markings or plain surfaces. 
The latter are often used as a base for 
interesting textured surfaces produced with 
plastic paints. 

In the same general category falls Ply- 
wood, which may be used either for nat- 
ural wood finishes or as a base for paint. 
Plywoods veneered with rare decorative 
woods give an appearance of richness far 
greater than their cost would indicate. 

AH of these materials have one advan- 
tage in common: they eliminate the damp- 
ness brought into the structure by fresh 
plaster and save the long drying period 
which plaster demands. Most of them, 
however, require a decorative handling 
which uses the joints between the units as 
a part of the design. ' 

In noisy environments it is worth while 
to take advantage of the new sound-absorb- 
ing tiles or sheet products, or even sound- 
absorbing plaster for ceilings. They have 
excellent decorative quality and when se- 
lected by an expert familiar with the kind 
of noise to be subdued can do much to 
alleviate traffic noise or other sounds. 

Floors 

Advances in hardwood flooring include 
factory-finished strip flooring that largely 
eliminates scraping and finishing on the 
job; parquetry flooring in square blocks 
that is decorative, durable and moderate m 
cost; and parquetry or plank floors made 
up of plywood that permits one to have a 
surface of rare or costly wood without the 
expense of solid boards. 

The newest trend in linoleum flooring is 
the introduction of specially designed bor- 
ders and "inset" or inlaid decorative de- 



signs to suit the shape and character of 
the room. Long favored for kitchens and 
baths, linoleum has now captured halls, 
living rooms and even bedrooms in a 
growing number of homes. I 

Asphalt tile remains the one flooring 
that may be used on concrete floors in 
contact with the ground, as in basements 
and enclosed sun terraces. On a higher 
cost level rubber tile offers durable resil- 
ient surfaces in a wide variety of colors 
and designs. 

Cork tile is a flooring that compares fa- 
vorably with the best hardwoods in cost, 
durability and adaptability. It has the fur- 
ther advantages of being non-skid and 
non-resonant. Cork flooring comes ir 
three basic shades with many variations 
so that it can be laid in attractive and in 
tricate designs or in narrow strips lik{ 
wood. With the former no rugs an 
needed because the floor pattern is highh 
decorative; with the latter, big rugs o 
small scatter-rugs can be safely used. Re 
cendy a permanent finish has been pei 
fected that needs no servicing such as wax 
ing or polishing. 




Cougoleum-Jsairn, I 

Floor and wall linoleum has been used w 
striking effect in this kitchen of a home m 
exclusive residential development. 

Ceramic tile, in some of its manif( 
forms, offers top quality in the field 
hard decorative floorings. The latter, . 
gether with asphalt tile, should be laid 
a concrete base; all the others may be I; 
on wood sub-floors or on bone-dry concr 
above ground. 

Interior Trim 
The same progress reported for do 
has been made in interior millwork. St* 
patterns by the best architects, follow 
traditional designs and offering acceptJ 
new ones, largely eliminate the need 
custom millwork for stairs, hand rails, ^ 
usters, cupboards, corner cabinets, firep. 
mantels, and all forms of "standing" t 
such as baseboards, chair-rails, cornices 
window and door frames. A wide var 
of selections make certain good taste 
reasonable cost. 



28 



SMALL HOME BUILPBKS VHA. B O O K- 1 9 3 8 - 1 9 3 9 EnlT. 



T 



Nairn, Inc. 





-t^iC 




ECOIOMICll PROGRAM 
FOR WIITER COMFORT 



YOUR NEW HOME... 

If you are building a new home, ask. 
your architect or builder about the 
niany clUcicat types and attractive 
styles of wimcrwindows and double- 
glazed sash available for ^'Window 
Conditioning." 

YOUR PRESENT HOME... 

May have the conifort and saving of 
"Window Conditioning," Storm win- 
dows ore easy to install and inexpen* 
eive to buy. An estimate from your 
lumber dealer will convince yon. 



Do away wth the threat of winter 
chills . . . ills ... aud bills. New comfort, 
belter health and economy are yours 
with "Window Conditioning." This 
means you insulate your windows 
with doid}le- glazed sash or storm 
windows — two panes of glass where 
only one was used before. Between 
the two, a wall of captive air is formed. 
This air space is one of the best forms 
of insulation. 

Reliable tests shotv that **Window 
Conditioning" saves more in fuel 
costs than any other single form of 
house insulation. Therefore it is the 
first form of insulation you should 
consider. "Window Conditioning" 
cuts 20 to 30% right off your fuel 
bill and permits healthful humidity 
without having windows fogged with 
excessive moisture which collects on 
uninsulated windows, soils draperies 
and rugs, spoils woodwork finishes. 



To "Window Condition" your pres- 
ent home,' call the nearest lumber 
dealer today. He can arrange financ- 
ing under F.H.A. with no down pay- 
ment. "Window Conditioning" is an 
investment that can pay for itself in 
less than two winters and dividends 
accrue year after year. » 

Quality Glass Is /mportant— With 
double glazing, the quality of glass is 
doubly important since you are look- 
ing through two pieces of glass in- 
stead of one. Because of an exclusive 
manufacturing process, L*0*F Win- 
dow Glass is noted for its greater 
freedom from waviness and distor- 
tion, making it especially suited to 
*'Window Conditioning." These ad- 
vantages cost you no more. When 
you buy winter windows or double- 
glazed sash, make sure that each light 
bears the L * O * F label. It is your 
guarantee of quality in window glass. 



IIBBEY'flWENS-IORD 



LOOK EOR THE LABEL 1^ 



SMALL HOME BUILDERS YEAR B O O K — 1 9 3 8 - 1 9 3 9 EDITION 




(DOUBLE -GLASS INSULATION) 

You insulate your windows by applying double-glazed sash 
or modern storm windows of L' O,' F Quality Glass. Here's 
what "Window Conditioning" dotes' for you — 

1. Gives you greater comfort — better health. 

2. Cuts fuel bills 20 to 30%. 

3. Saves you more than any other single form of house 
insulation. 

4. Makes uniform temperatures easier to maintain through- 
out the house. 

5. Lessens drafty danger zones near windows and floors. 

6. Makes healthful humidity possible without foggy win- 
dows, soiled draperies and moisture on window sills. 

7. Reduces cleaner's bills and even doctor's bills. 

8. Fuel savings help pay for a modern heating plant. 

9. "Window Conditioning" is c. sound investment — fuel 
savings alone can pay for it in less than two winters. 
Dividends continue ye^qr after year. Financed under 
F.H.A. — no down pc^frfent. 

• S»nd ceupon for fiee L-O-F booUet compl*Ul|r deicrlbing 
"Window Conditioning and contlining inlCKlling mtormition 
on tre.lminl of windowi. /- 



UBBEY- OWENS -FORO GIASS COMPANY, TOLEDO, OHIO 

Please send me your free booklet ivhicli 
shows typical exomples of economics effected 
^'itli "Window Conditioning" and interesting CPCE 



window treatment. 

Name 

Address^ 
City 



ify home hast 

□ Woud Sash 

□ Metal Sash 

BYB-aa 



29 






Building Materials 
Home Equipment 
Home Furnishings 
Home Decorations 
Home Insurance 

Available 
from Our Advertisers 

SEE PAGE 64 

Cheek Those You Wont and 
Mail the Coupon to 

NATIONAL SMALL 
HOMES BUREAU, INC. 

572 Madison Ave., New Yorit 



28 PRIZES 

SEE PAGE 64 

Have You Read the Rules 
of the 

^500 PRIZE 
LETTER CONTEST? 

You Can Win a Prize 
by Writing a Letter 
About Your Home. 

: Start Now — ^Write as 
Many Letters as You 
Like. Send Them to 

NATIONAL SMALL 
HOMES BUREAU, INC. 

572 Madison Ave., New York 




C 



t 



OF GOOD PAINTING 



Every house uses paint, inside or out, 
not only when it is built but periodically 
throughout the years to come. So it is 
important to know what makes a good 
painting job — one that costs as little as 
possible, that lasts long, that looks well, 
and that makes repainting easy. 

Good painting is always the product of 
three things: (1) a paint of the right com- 
position for the particular job at hand; 
(2) good painting conditions at the time 
the work is done; and (3) good work- 
manship. If you want to simplify that 
combination you can say that good paint- 
ing is the result of good paint and good 
workmanship because an expert painter 
will never apply paint unless conditions 
are right. 

Buying Paints 
The average home owner cannot hope 
to qualify as an expert in paint because 
to do so he would have to study a subject 
of immense technical complexity. So his 
best recourse is to entrust his entire job to 
a contracting painter of known skill and 
good local reputation. 
; But if you like to delve into such a 
subject to a somewhat greater extent, it 
is well to begin with a knowledge of the 
labor costs. Painting is usually two to 
three times the cost of the materials. It 
takes a painter just as long to put on a 
poor quality paint as to apply the very 
best materials. Therefore, it is false econ- 
omy to attempt to save costs by buying 
cheap paints. And in this freely competi- 
tive market you can be quite certain that 
cheap paints are low grade paints and 
higher-priced paints are high grade prod- 
ucts, when both are made for the same 
purpose. Paints made for different pur- 
poses, as exterior and interior paints, can- 
not be compared on a price basis. 

Kinds of Paint 

When buying exterior paints for outside 
woodwork, siding, trim, etc., the choice lies 
between the so-called pure single pigment 
paints and mixed paints. White lead in 
oil is the only quality pure pigment paint 
employed in residential work, for white 
lead is the only material that combines 
within itself the desired qualities of dura- 
bility, resistance to weathering, good cov- 
ering power and slow calking which makes 
the whole surface easy to repaint. 

The better quality mixed paints can be 



identified by the other elements marked 
on the label. Zinc compounds are fre- 
quently used with white lead to give 
greater hardness. Titanium compounds 
will be found on many labels, in combina- 
tion with lead and usually zinc because 
titanium is extremely white and has great 
hiding power. The cheaper exterior mixed 
paints use these pigments in relatively 
small quantities and make up the differ- 
ence with chalks, sands or 'barium com- 
pounds. Read the label on the paint you 
are buying and compare it with the formu- 
las for other brands that are higher or 
lower in cost, and with this general infor- 
mation you can usually determine for 
yourself the approximate grade of the paint 
offered. 

Paint is a temperamental material and 
will not behave well unless it is applied 
when conditions are just right. Dampness 
is the great destroyer of good piliiit, espe- 
cially dampness on the surface to \vhich It 
is applied. 

Manufacturers always provide carefully 
worded instructions for the use of their 
products and failure to follow these in- 
structions places the blame sqyarely upon 
the user. A good painter will take great 
precaution with the preparation of the 
surface and will wait until the weather is 
good (if it is outside work) or there has 
been ample time for drying out plaster 
in the case of interior work before he will 
waste labor and materials under conditions 
that are bound to cause difficulties. 

Exterior paints should be renewed every 
three to five years, even with good quality 
materials. The best outside paint wears 
gradually to a chalky surface that can 
easily be dusted off leaving the remaining 
coating firmly adhered to the material un- 
derneath. A new coat should be applied 
before this chalking wears down to the 
wood. When paint fails In any other way, 
if by cracking, blistering, pealing, or by 
excessive and rapid chalking, the old coats 
should be removed and a new job done 
as soon as possible, in order to protect the 
underlying material. 

So the cardinal rules for economical 
maintenance are these: Buy high quality 
paints from reputable manufacturers; have 
them applied by an experienced and reli- 
able painter; and repaint before the origi- 
nal coating has worn through to the un- 
derlying surface. 



30 



SMALL HOME BUILDERS YEAR B O O K — 1 9 3 8 - 1 9 3 9 EDITION 



TO KNOW 




'|I0M^&I2 




IN WOOD-FRAMED HOUSES 



J 



WOOD is by far the most impor- 
tant building material used in 
house construction today. Upon 
its proper use depends to a very large ex- 
tent the quality, durability, fire-safety and 
market value of a house. ^ 

Every prospective home owner, whether 
he intends to buy or build, will find it help- 
ful to know how to distinguish good de- 
sign and workmanship from poor, for only 
with such knowledge can he appraise the 
soundness of his investment. Fortunately 
it is not necessary to become an expert to 
tell the good from the bad. In every 
house there are a few "key" points that 
are important; if these are properly con- 
structed, it may be safely assumed that 
the quality of the rest of the contractor's 
work is equally sound. 

These "key" points are described or il- 
lustrated in this article. They have been 
selected out of many hundreds of details 
known to experts as points that a home 
owner, without previous building expe- 
rience, can observe for himself during the 
construction of a house. They are the 
"clues" by which the amateur detective 
can find good construction. 

For the sake of simplicity, these "key" 
points or "clues" can be grouped into four 



parts of the house: the foundation, the 
floor framework, including bearing posts, 
girders and Joists; the walls and partitions 
built of studding; and the roof. The re- 
maining framing members are incidental 
to these parts. 

The Foundation 

Upon the strength and stability of the 
foundation depends the sturdiness of the 
future house. Concrete blocks, poured con- 
crete, brick and stone are the masonry ma- 
terials 'Usually employed for foundations. 
Local building codes determine the re- 
quired thickness; commonly 12" to \6" , 
These walls rest upon "footings" of mason- 
ry — enlargements of the base of the wall to 
give a firm bearing on the soil beneath. 

Good design demands that these foot- 
ings, the first point to watch for, be flat 
bottomed, resting squarely on firm ground 
and at least 6" wider on each side than the 
walls above, with a minimum depth of 
8", In poor bearing soil they should be 
still wider and deeper. Footings under 
posts should be 8" to 12" deep and 18" 
to 24" square. In damp soil a drain of 
at least 4" drain tile (6" preferred) should 
be laid around the outside of the footings 
and carried to a dry well, storm sewer or 



other drainage point at a lower level well 
away from the foundations. (See Fig. 5.) 

When this cannot be doiie, and where 
ground water may prove troublesome, the 
foundation walls should be waterproofed 
with at least a coat of hot pitch or asphalt 
or a half-inch layer of rich cement mortar 
on the outside. 

Porch piers and their footings should be 
as carefully built as other foundations if 
they are to support the porch without sag. 

Types of Framing 

Three types of wood framing are in use: 
"braced" frame, "balloon" frame and "plat- 
form" frame. All are good when prop- 
erly constructed, but the balloon frame is 
the one most commonly encountered and 
will serve as a guide to good construction. 
It is distinguished by the fact that the 
outside wall studs and corner posts are 
carried two stories high and the second 
floor joists are spiked to the sides of these 
studs where they rest on a "false girt" or 
"ribbon board" notched into them on the 
inside. (See Fig. 6.) 

As in all types of construction it is easy 
to cheapen the job by skimping details that 
distinguish good workmanship from poor. 




F'g. I.-— It does not take experience to dis- 
tinguish good and poor workmanship and 
construction Above: Shoddy work; note 
horizontal sheathing, lack of permanent cor- 
ner bracing weak construction over open- 
ings. Right: Every detail is correct: 



SMALL HOME BUILDERS 



YEAR BOOK— 1938-1939 EDITION 



31 




The sill should be firmly seated 
on the foundation and secured 
to it. At left: Note bolts and 
close fit of wood to masonry. 
Below: Poor work; pieces of slate 
fill gap between sill and masonry. 



Fig. 2 



v_ 



!'■ 



■r 



Solid 
Bridging 




Double joi 
under parhnon 




Figs. 3 



AlUc Floor. 



AtHc Floor 
joisl'S 



Roof Boards 



Fire Stepping 
mat'eriai 



Ouhside — 
Wall Sfud 

Fire itops. 



Brace 

False Girt_ 
1x4" 

Fire Ctop — 

BuilNup— 
ODrner PoiF 
(}pcs.n4) 



Box 5iil- 



Beam Filling 
Foundation Wail 




Fig. 4 



Bridging stiffens construction by 
making each member help the 
others. A load at A (Fig. 3). 
as of a piano, would be spread 
to four other joists as shown by 
arrows. Wide openings (Fig. 4) 
should be built like a bridge to 
carry loads from above. 



Mwayi grade 
from house^ 




(Optional) 
Capillary sfofl 
Bituminous 
MailicTrowel 



b'Tile prelerred. place at boUom 
oMooting. Mm pitch Vs'tol-O' 

Pig, 5._Section of Foundation 
Wall and Footing. 

Fig. 6.— (Left) Correct "Bal- 
loon" framing. Important details 
to watch for are: ( I ) First floor 
joists are laid and floored before 
wall studs are erected. Level 
of top of girder (2) is same as 
foundation wall. Corners should 
be braced (3) with permanent 
diagonal members as shown. 



Three clues to good balloon framing are 
marked by arrows in Fig. 6. 

Supporting Timbers 

The sill furnishes a method of securing 
the house to the foundation and provides 
a nailing surface for the first floor joists. 
It should not just set on the foundation 
but must be firmly anchored to it by means 
of bolts or concrete. See Fig. 2 for good 
and bad examples. 

Joists support the floors. Their depth 
and spacing must be proper for the length 
of the space they -span and for the load 
they are to carry, otherwise floors will sag 
and squeak and ceiling plaster will crack. 
And by all means they should be 
"bridged," as shown in Fig. 3; at least once 
in spans of 8 feet or more. Bridgmg 
triples the strength of the floor. 

Floors 

Every house should have two parts in 
each floor, the subfloor and the exposed or 
finished floor. The subfloor of rough 
boards should be laid diagonally over the 
joists as it gives a better foundation for 
the finished floor and, particularly ^on upper 
floors, adds stiffness to the structure. 

Proper nailing is essential if creaking 
and squeaking of floors is to be prevented. 
Here is a clue: subfloor boards 4'' or 6" 
wide should show two nails in each board 
at each joist; wider boards should have 
three nails. The finished floor should be 
laid at an angle to the subfloor and prefer- 
ably at right angles to the joists. 

Avoiding Shrinkage 

When lumber dries it shrinks across the ] 
grain but only very slighdy lengthwise ; 
with the grain. Modern methods of grad- ■ 
ing and drying lumber have reduced the | 
shrinkage problem materially. Modern 
methods of designing house framing to ^ 
equalize what litde shrinkage may occur 
have made it possible to eliminate strains 
that cause plaster cracks due to unequal 
setriement or wind pressure. 

The principle followed is to have the 
same amount of lumber used across the 
grain in the side \valls and in the "bear- 
ing" partitions and beams in the interior^ 
That is why, in balloon framing, the top 
of the basement girder in Fig. 6 is kept at 
foundation level and the bearing partition 
studs are brought down to it. Any shrmk- 
age in first floor joists upon which the out- 
side wall studs are supported is equalized 
by similar shrinkage in the beam made uf 
of members of the same depth. A study o! 
this drawing will show other points wher( 
the same principle is followed. 



32 



SMALL HOME EUILDEKS YEAR 



BooK-1938-1939 EDiTio: 



Wall and Partftion Framing 
Good workmanship in wall and other 
internal framing can be identified in a 
number of ways. Upon the strength of 
the outside walls and the load-bearing par- 
titions within (which carry the inner ends 
of the floor joists) depends the ability of 
the structure to carry the weight of the 
house and its contents and to resist wind 
pressure. Here are some more clues: 

Non-bearing partitions, which serve only 
as screens between rooms, should be sup- 
ported by double-bridged joists. Studs sup- 
porting framing around stairways should 
be doubled. All bearing partitions should 
have double top plates (horizontal mem- 
bers on which joists rest) and should be 
braced with solid bridging not less than 
1" thick and full width of studs. All 
openings for doors and windows should be 
reenforced with extra ipembers at the 
sides and special details at the head. 

Wide openings in bearing partitions 
should be trussed as shown in Fig. 4. Win- 
dows should have double headers, usually 
set on edge for wide openings. Floor joists 
should have a full bearing on the parti- 
tions which support them as indicated in 
Fig. 7, Good workmanship is also revealed 
by the care with which members are cut 
and fitted together. See Figs. 1, 7, 10, 12 
and 15 and contrast them with the corre- 
sponding details showing poor work. 

Reducing Fire Hazard 

Fire safety in houses does not depend 
upon covering the exterior with masonry; 
rather it depends upon preventing the 
rapid spread of fire through hollow walls 
and floors. Fire-stopping at the vital points 
within the frame of the structure confines 
to a limited area any fire that might start 
within the house. 

Fire-stopping consists of 2" boards, mor- 
tar, brick and mortar, mineral wool or 
other incombustible material placed at 
strategic points within the frame to dam 
the flue-like hollow spaces between joists 
and studs so that fire and hot gases can- 
not be drawn through them. The circles 
in Fig. 14 give the clues to where to look 
for fire-stopping in the correctly built bal- 
loon frame house. To be effective, the fire- 
stopping must be well fitted and tight. 

The Chimney 

When the chimney is built do not allow 
the carpenters to fasten framing members 
to it as the best chimney built will settle 
somewhat and the wood may shrink at a 
different rate. Uneven setdement will 
cause plaster to crack and floors to sag. 

The chimney should be self-supported 
and so constructed as to be independent 
of the house framing. (See Fig. 15.) Com- 




Above: In good work the floor [oisfs are sup- 
ported by the full width of a beam or partition. 
At right, above: Horrible example of careless 
workmanship; cellar beam cuf ^nd offset for 
heating duct. At right: Joists are butted on 
supports, each getting half the proper bearing. 




In good workmanship every member is care- 
fully cut and fitted, as In the roof above (Fig. 
10], For contrast, note the poor work in the 
roof at right (Fig. II). 

Sir, /, in a well built house structural mem- 
bers »iill not be weakened to make room for 
pipes. Compare Figs. 12 and 13 for good and 
bad work. 



SMALL HOME BUILDERS Y E A R B O O K — 1 9 3 8 - 1 9 3 9 EDITIO 



33 



~1 




Fig. 14 
The circles show the important places where 
"fire-stopping" should be found in balloon fram- 
ing. Heavy pieces of wood, mortar or mineral 
wool should block each horizontal and vertical 
air space to prevent spread of fire through them. 

bustible materials, including wood framing 
members, should be at least 2" from the 
chimney wall. These spaces should later 
be filled with mortar, mineral wool or 
other incombustible material. 

The chimney should be built with a 
terra cotta lining in each flue enclosed in 
walls at least 4" thick if of brick and 8" 
thick if of stone. If the flue lining is 
omitted the masonry thickness should be 
doubled. Any increase in the wall thick- 
ness of a chimney should be made at least 
12'' below the rafters and not above the 
roof, except for capping at the top. Chim- 
neys should extend 3 feet above a flat roof 
and at least 2 feet above the ridge of a 
sloping roof. 

The Roof 

The lack of sufficient pitch probably 
causes more "roof trouble" than any other 
factor. In climates where snowfall is ex- 
cessive the pitch of the roof should not be 
less than one-third (or 8" rise in each foot 
of horizontal run). 

Narrow roof sheathing boards spaced 
2" apart make the ideal foundation for 



34 



wood shingles as they allow air to reach 
the under side of the shingles, keeping 
them dry and giving them longer life. (See 
Fig. 10.) The roof should be insulated with 
an approved insulating material to prevent 
formation of "oven-like" attics. 

Wood shingles make an ideal roof cov- 
ering. If they are not to be stained they 
should be thoroughly soaked in water be- 
fore application. If they are to be stained, 
the dry shingles should be dipped two- 
thirds of their length in the stain and then 
dried. For best results use edge-grain 
shingles having a thickness at the butt 
such that the thick ends of five shingles 
will measure 2 inches- 
Plaster and Interior Finish 

Plaster is not elastic and if there is any 
decided movement in the framing that 
supports it, it will crack. The first requi- 
site for a good plaster job is a rigid frame. 
However, poor plaster may be found in 
otherwise sound houses due to inferior 
quality or careless workmanship. 

Interior trim (including the lumber used 
for base boards, picture and cornice mould- 
ings, door and window casings, finished 
flooring, etc.) is seasoned and kiln-dried 
before leaving the mill aid should be pro- 
tected from moisture ur "1 it is in place. 
It should not be allowed o stand out in 
the open after being delivc ^d to the site, 
nor should it be brought into the house 
until after the plaster has dried. 

Carelessness in protecting finishing ma- 
terial is an indication of trouble for the fu- 
ture home owner. Trim installed when 
damp will swell, warp and then develop 
unsighdy cracks when it dries. 

Doors should receive two coats of paint 
on the top and bottom edges as they are 
hung. The paint prevents, to a large ex- 
tent, the absorption of moisture that would 
cause the door to swell and bind with 
every rainy spell. Window trim, particu- 
larly sills and stools, should be tightly fitted 
and painted to keep out rain and wind. 

House Siding 

Correct selection of the type and grade 
of siding for the outside wall covering is 
exceedingly important for it is on the out- 
side of a house, subjected alike to sun, 
wind, rain and snow that lumber receives 
the most severe usage. The wood should 
be of a decay-resisting species that will 
hold tight at the joints and that will hold 
paint. It should be thort hly air-dry. 

All joints around window frames and 
corner boards, or at mitered corners, and 
all splice joints should be carefully fitted. 
Siding and all exposed woodwork should 
be given a priming coat of good paint as 
soon as it is in place and dry. 



ILLUSTRATIONS 

The photographs showing good con- 
struction were all ta\en during the build- 
ing of Connecticut House, an exhibit 
house erected in New Canaan, Conn., by 
Alexander Houses, Inc., to demonstrate its 
design and building methods. 

The contrasting photographs, showing 
faulty construction, were fallen in a num- 
ber of other houses built in the New Yor\ 
Metropolitan area at the same time. 

Only by careful and systematic elimina- 
tion of common defects in current practice 
can substantial improvements in house 
construction be made. These camera 
studies of poor building methods were 
actually used in analyzing such defects and 
in deueloping the improved structural and 
mechanical design represented by Connec- 
ticut House, 




Chimneys should not support or be in contact 
with framing members. At Top: Correct; dou- 
bled joists keep clear of masonry. Below: Dan- 
gerous construction; second floor joists built 
into chimney. Plaster cracks will result. 



SMALLHOME BUILDERS YEAR BOOK 1938-1939 EDITION 



K 



Important Scientific Advance in Roof Protection 

Special Triple Sealed Process 

— ^Used for New Celotex Shingles and Siding 




Finest Materials Yet Developed 

Mean Extra Years of Beauty and 

Protection At No Added Cost 

To You 



'T'HERE'S no easy way for the average buyer to test quality or 
-^ judge value in shingles and siding until years after you buy — 
no sure guide except the reputation, integrity and progressive- 
ness of the manufacturer. 

Celotex, a recognized leader in developing improved huildivg 
imderials, now offers you Triple Sealed Roofing Products, developed 
scicnlificallij for greater beaidy — added prolecHon — extra years of 
service without extra cost. 

For lasting beauty, the choicest mineral surfacing granules have 
been used — more brilliant and richer in color— yet remarkably 
resistant to the sun's destructive actinic rays! 



Celotex Shad-0'Grain SMttfjIcs, in a 
vuriely of briUianl colors, ojfcr a new, 
(hev-nhadow, (/rained beauly for your 
roof. 



Similarly, asphalts used in the Triple Sealing development are 
processed to preserve the Hfe of the shingles-tempered and 
mineral filled for resistance to weather and climate. 
Safeguard your investment — insist on the extra quality and 
longer protection now made possible by better materials ami 
metliods, and certified by the Celotex name! 
Don't gamble with protection. See your Triple Sealed Roofing 
dealer, or mail coupon now. 




REMEMBER — CELO- 
TEX TRIPLE SEALED 
SHINGLES. SIDING 
AND ROLL ROOF- 
ING ARE SOLD 
THROUGH ME — 
YOUR LOCAL RE- 
TAIL DEALER — TO 
ASSURE you SERV- 
ICE AND SATIS- 
FACTION. 



^■Bi^^ REG. U.S. PAT. OFF. "^ ^"^ 



THE CELOTEX CORPORATION SH*3S 

919 N. jMiohigan Ave., Chicigo, 111. 

Without obligation, please send me free booklets in 
full color on Celotex Triple Sealed D Shingles 
D Siding Q Roll Roofing. 



TRIPLE SEALED 



I 

I Name. 



Address . 



City. 



.County State. 



SMALL HOME BUILDERS YEAR BOOK 1938-1939 EDITION 



35 



(z:::>^n^^i^l<^tt(>n^ K^^a^t^ J Matkin.a — 



IT PAYS FOR ITSELF 



INSULATION, in all its various forms, 
is the one element in a building that 
actually costs nothing! It is more ex- 
pensive to live in a house that has no in- 
sulation than to own an otherwise identical 
house that is properly insulated. And i£ 
you already own one built before insulation 
was understood, you can have a complete 
installation made without spending a pen- 
ny of your own! Can any subject be more 
important to the home owner than one that 
promises so much? 

People often thmk of house insulation 
rather narrowly, as meaning the addition 
of something in the attic or roof to reduce 
the escape of warmth in winter and to 
keep out heat in summer. Actually insu- 
lation means much more, for it includes 
storm sash or double glass of some sort in 
all doors and windows, weatherstripping 
of these openings to lessen air leakage, 
awnings for cooler windows in summer 
and the use of building insulation in all 
exposed parts of the house, including walls, 



floors over unheated spaces and an un- 
heated attic or the roof. 

Professor G. L. Larson of the Univer- 
sity of Wisconsin made a careful study of ■ 
the dollar value of winter insulation meth- 
ods and proved beyond question that all 
of them pay for themselves. In new house 
construction, where the heating plant 
could be selected after the insulation 
methods were decided upon, he found that 
enough money could be saved, by using a 
small boiler, radiators and piping, to more 
than pay for the work that made a smaller 
heating plant possible. 

His figures also show that fuel savings 
alone (as in the case of a house that al- 
ready has a heating plant large enough for 
uninsulated construction) will pay back 
the cost of insulation in from IV2 to 10 
years, showing a return of anywhere from 
9'/^ to 73 per cent on the investment. No 
bank ever paid such generous dividends to 
its depositors! 

Professor Larson's exact figures would 



FUEL SAVINGS FROM HOUSE INSULATION— BY PROF. G. L. LARSON 
UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN 





1 

ou 


c 
?-, c "G 




g ^ 

^55 


.£t3 

. S n 


J2 

"(0 

•SI'S 

ta Q n 

^d3 


>> 

id » 

SS 

w u 



Y'>' Insulation 
(Walls and Ceiling) 
Plus Storm Sash 
and Doors 


4' Insulation 
(Walls and Ceiling) 
Plus Storm Sash 
and Doors 


Total Heat Loss 


159,175 


153,871 


149,524 


139,974 


125.741 


118,773 


110,'383 


91,182 


69,981 


Percent saving 




3.34 


6.07 


12.1 


21.0 


25.4 


30.8 


42.7 


55.9 


Sq. Ft. H. W. Radia- 
tion 


1060 


1025 


995 


932 


837 


791 


735 


608 


466 


Fuel per season, gals. 


3980 


3847 


3738 


3499 


3143 


2969 


2759 


217^ 


1750 


Cost of Fuel per season 


$286 


$277 


$269 


$252 


$226 


$214 


$198 


$164 


$126 


Saving in Fuel 




$9 


$17 


$34 


$60 


$72 


$88 


$122 


$160 


Cost of Construction 




$51 


$102 


$142 


$129 


$284 


$106 


$248 


$390 


Interest and Depreci- 
ation on investment 




$3.57 


$7.14 


$9.94 


$9.03 


$19.88 


$10.60 


$20.54 


$30.48 


Net Saving 




$5.43 


$9.86 


$24.06 


$50.97 


$52.12 


$77.40 


$101.46 


$129.52 


Percent return on in- 
vestment, net 




10.6 


9.65 


16.9 


39.5 


18.3 


73.0 


41.0 


33.4 


Years for net fuel sav- 
ing to pay off in- 
vestment 




9.4 


10.3 


5.9 


2.53 


5.45 


1.37 


2.45 


3.01 


Cost of heating plant 


$1590 


$1537 


$1492 


$1398 


$1256 


$1186 


$1102 


$912 

$678 


$699 


Reduction in plant 
cost 




$53 


$98 


$192 


$334 


$404 


$488 


$891 



not apply to houses in other sections where 
both climate and costs vary, but all author- 
ities agree that winter windows, weather- 
stripping and building insulation all return 
their cost very quickly. A study of four, 
hundred houses shows where heat losses 
occur in winter. Of the total generated, 
15 per cent goes through roof or ceiling, 
30 per cent through side walls, 26 per cent 
more through the glass in windows and 
doors, 21 per cent through the cracks 
around these openings, and about 8 per 
cent through cold floors. Thus all forms 
of protection are valuable and each pays 
generous dividends. 

And these returns are in cash! They 
do not show the greater summer comfort 
insulation will provide. They do not re- 
flect the actual cash savings which both 
insulation and awnings will bring to 
owners who operate summer cooling, 
equipment. They utterly neglect the bet- 
ter health that follows comfort and free- 
dom from drafts and chills. 

Under the provisions of the National 
Housing Act all these advantages can be 
had for existing houses without any actual 
expense to the owner. A i-rfodernization 
loan under Title I, as described elsewhere 
in this book, requires no down payment, 
and can be paid off in five years or less out 
of the fuel savings resulting from install- 
ing storm windows and insulation. 

Any architect or qualified air condition- 
ing or insulation contractor can figure out 
the actual cost and direct savings of each 




36 



liibliey- Owens-Ford Glass Co. 
The house +0 which the calculations in the table 
are applied is illustrated above. It is 2 stories 
high with unfinished attic space and contains 8 
rooms and bath above the basement. It is of 
frame construction with concrete foundation. 
Windows were assumed to permit air leakage 
equivalent to 2 air changes per hour. Storm 
sash was assumed to reduce this one-half. The 
heating season was 260 days. Oil at 7.2 c, 
140,000 B.t.u., operated at 65% efficiency. 
These results show savings under relatively severe 
climatic conditions and, while a good indication 
of the efficiency of insulation, are in no sense 
typical or average. Savings from insulation vary 
with every house. 

SMALL HOME BUILDERS YEAR BOOK 1938-1939 EDITION 



They 




AlexanUur Houses, Inc. 
How Insulation is protected -from condensation 
in walls. During plastering a huge amount of 
water must be evaporated and NOT absorbed 
by the Insulation. When the house is in use 
the inside walls must be as tight as, or tighter 
than, the outside walls, to prevent warm air 
from getting into the space between and caus- 
ing condensation in the Insulation. 

form of insulation you might use in your 
house. Then, if you do not want to bor- 
row or cannot make this profitable invest- 
ment all at once, you can determine what 
steps to take first. 

Winter windows, or double glass of any 
practical form, stop about 50% of the heat 
loss through glass in winter. They cost 
surprisingly little, but it is well to specify 
a good quality clear glass so that vision 
will not be impaired. Double glazing (two 
barriers of glass) also reduces fogging and 
condensation on windows so effectively 
that they are practically indispensable in 
any house that is to have winter air con- 
ditioning and healthful humidification. 

Weatherstripping, if of good quality, 
will stop 75 to 90% of the air leakage 
around windows and doors. Low grade 
materials are hardly worth bothering with, 
for the slight difference in cost between 
the best and the cheapest may mean a 
very wide difference in efliciency. 

There are four basically different kinds 
of insulation from which to choose: rigid 
fiber boards, flexible blankets, "fill" insuUv 
tions of mineral wool fibers or porous 
mineral granules, and reflective metal in- 
sulations. All four types are effective, dura- 
ble and eminently satisfactory when prop- 
erly used and correctly installed. All of 
them produce the desired result of check- 
ing heat movement, summer and winter, 
though they may work by different meth- 
ods. Each type has its own advantages and 
limitations; no one type is superior to all 
others under all circumstances. 



Choice should be based upon the con- 
dition to be met, considering the amount 
of insulating effectiveness needed, ease of 
installation and cost installed. The first 
step is to have some competent person 
figure out how much insulating effect is 
needed, for neither too much nor too little 
pays best dividends. The second is to 
obtain estimates of cost for the different 
types that will fit the job, each in the 
thickness or number of layers (as in the 
case of reflective foils) required to give 
the desired protection. The third is to 
buy products of a reputable manufacturer 
and make certain that the installation is 
made in accordance with the manufactur- 
er's recommendations. 

There has been much misinformation in 
circulation about moisture in insulated 
walls and roofs. All forms of insulation 
may contribute to the formation of frost 
or dampness in the insulated spaces if 
water vapor is allowed to reach them from 
the inside, or is not given a free escape 
to the colder outside air. Recent scientific 
research has laid this dampness bug-a-boo 
to rest forever, for it has been established 
that 'either of two methods will prevent 
hidden condensation in new, or cure it in 
existing buildings. 

One method is to use a "vapor-barrier" 
between the insulation and the warm inte- 
rior where all the moisture originates'. 
This barrier may be part of the insulation 
itself or may be a covering of a paper or 
other material through which vapor will 
not pass. 

The other is to allow the walls or roof 
to "breathe" to the cold outside air so that 
any moisture or vapor coming from the 
warm inside air can continue its natural 
outward movement without hindrance. 
The story of insulation is not quite com- 
plete unless summer conditions are con- 
sidered. About one-quarter of the heat 
that enters a house in summer comes in 
through windows exposed to direct sun- 
light. Practically all of this heat "gain" 
can be stopped by awnings or outside 
shade, The remaining three-quarters of 
the outside heat comes in through the roof 
and the side walls. The same building 
insulation that checks heat loss in winter 
will work equally well in summer to keep 
out unwanted warmth. While the ad- 
vantages of protection in summer cannot 
be measured in dollars unless air-condi- 
tioning equipment is being operated for 
actual cooling, they are reflected in lower 
temperatures and greater livability indoors, 
day and night. 

If comfort, health, and money in your 
pocket are things you desire, you can have 
them all simply by making use of this 
modern knowledge of insulation. 



Stretch Your 
Building Dollars 




QM 






lu selecliug insulatiou, the efficiency of tbe 
material is iiuportaut . . . but no more so 
than the cost of purchasing and installing 
it. Ou all these points Kiuisul* gives you 
more for your building dollar. Because the 
new development of expandability... added 
to its high efficiency . . . provides additional 
economies in good insulation. 

Kimsul is made in blankets 20 inches 
long and the right width to fit bet^veen 
studs. Installed, each 20 inch blanket is 
pulled down like a shade, snugly fitting 
the opening and forming a continuous, 
e\Qn thicktiess of protective blanket from 
top to bottom wtliout cutting or fitting. 

Work of installing is speeded up and 
labor costs materially lessened . . . there is 
no 'waste, any left over pieces can be used 
to fill cracks and irregular spaces. 

Kimsul 3tects These IteQiiirements 
of Gootl Insulation 



1 Efficiency 

2 Flexibility 

3 Permanence 

4 Non-Settling 



5 Lightness 

6 Proper Thickness 
T No Waste 

8 Ease of Handling 



SMALL HOME BUILDERS YEAR BOOK — 1938-193 9 EDITION 



9 Expandability 

Ask your Architect, Contractor or Biulding 

Material Dealer ... or ^vTite for free book 

Kimsul— "Year 'Round Insulation." 

*Reg. U. S. and Can. Pat. Off. 

KIMBERLY-CLARK CORPORATION 

Established 1872 • Neenah, Wis. 
122 East 42nd Street • 8 South Michigon Avenue 
NEW YORK CHICAGO 



37 



Ax 



BUILD FOR LESS 



Leading Magazines 
Stress These Points: 




1 Moisture which condenses 
■ in walls and top-floor ceil- 
ings comes from within the 
house, not from outside. 

2 The simplest, surest way to 
■ prevent this condensation 
is by means of a properly located 
"vapor seal." 

3 To be effective, this seal 
■ must be located on or near 
the warm side of the insulation 
itself or near the warm side of 
the wail. 

• 

Celotcx Vapor -seal Sheathing 
builds weather-tight insulated 
outer walls with a properly 
located vapor seal. The "breath- 
ing space" within the wall is re- 
tained. The special asphalt-and- 
aluminum-coated surface on the 
new Celotex Vapor-seal Lath 
seals vapor inside the room and 
out of the wall. Use the extra 
thick Celotex Vapor-seal Lath 
for top-floor ceilings. 



THE CELOTEX CORPORATION 
919 N. Michigaa Ave., s.H.ss 

Chicago, 111. 

Without obligation, to tne, please 
send new FREE booklet, New 
Money Saving Ideas for Home 
Builders. 



Name 

Address.. 

City 

County... 
State. 



This is FHA's 6-room, low cost ''HOUSE E," built at Bethesda, Md. 
At little or no added cost, you could add insulation to this type 
house by using Celotex Vapor-seal Insulating Sheathing in place 
of ordinary sheathing. For less than $60 extra you co^ld have 
complete insulation — Celotex Vapor-seal Lath on the inside and 
Celotex Vapor-seal Sheathing on the outside! 

Actually, you would be adding ^175 to ^200 worth of insulation to FHA 
"House E" — yet it would cost you less than ^60 extra, because Celotex 
replaces building materials you would otherwise have to buy. 

You would have all the advantages of Celotex insulation, guaranteed in 
writing for the life of the building — fine, strong, plastered interior walls— 
permanently weather-tight outer walls — summer comfort — and winter fuel 
savings which alone would soon pay the small extra cost. And this perma- 
nent insulation is permanently guarded against termites and dry rot by 
the exclusive, patented Ferox Process! 

See your architect, contractor, and Celotex lumber dealer for accurate 
money-saving facts on building with Celotex. 

REG. U. S. PAT, OFF. 

GUARAMTEED INSULATION 



38 



SMALL HOMEBUILDERS YEAR BOOK 1938-1939 EDITION 



J 



V , 





Leading Magazines 
Stress These Points: 




1 Moisture which condenses 
■ in walls and top-floor ceil- 
ings comes from within the 
house, not from outside. 

2 The simplest, surest way to 
■ prevent this condensation 
is by means of a properly located 
"vapor seal." 

3 To be effective, this seal 
■ must be located on or near 
the warm side of the insulation 
itself or near the warm side of 
the wall. 

• 

Celotex Vapor-seal Sheathing 
builds weather-tight insulated 
outer walls with a properly 
located vapor seal. The "breath- 
ing space" within the wall is re- 
tained. The special asphalt-and- 
aluminum-coated surface on the 
new Celotex Vapor-seal Lath 
seals vapor inside the room and 
out of the wall. Use the extra 
thick Celotex Vapor-seal Lath 
for top-floor ceilings. 

I — — . 

I THE CELOTEX CORPORATION 

I 919 N. Michigan Ave., s.h.m 

I Chicago, 111. 

I Without obligation to me, please 

1 send new FREE booklet, New 

I Money Saving Ideas for Home 

I Builders. 

I Name 

I Address - 

I Ciiy 

I County 

{ State. - -- - 

I — — — 

38 

4i 



This is FHA's 6-room, low cost ''HOUSE E," built at Bethesda, Md. 
At little or no added cost, you could add insulation to this type 
house by using Celotex Vapor-seal Insulating Sheathing in place 
of ordinary sheathing. For less than $60 extra you could have 
complete insulation — Celotex Vapor-seal Lath on the inside and 
Celotex Vapor-seal Sheathing on the outside! 

Actually, you would be adding ^175 to ^200 worth of insulation to FHA 
"House E" — yet it would cost you less than ^60 extra, because Celotex 
replaces building materials you would otherwise have to buy. 

You would have all the advantages of Celotex insulation, guaranteed in 
writing for the life of the building — fine, strong, plastered interior walls — 
permanently weather-tight outer walls — summer comfort — and winter fuel 
savings which alone would soon pay the small extra cost. And this perma- 
nent insulation is permanently guarded against termites and dry rot by 
the exclusive, patented Ferox Process! 

See your architect, contractor, and Celotex lumber dealer for accurate 
money-saving facts on building with Celotex. 



REG. U. S. PAT. OFF, 



GUARANT 



A DOZEN years ago, the pioneer 
developer of cane fiber insulating 
building materials, issued a ^varn- 
ing to home builders to which forward 
thinking home owners have given in- 
creasing attention in the years inter- 
vening. 




B. G. Dahlberg 

"Look Ahead!", said this executive 
in his company's advertising as early 
as 1926. "Look ahead! Heat-leaking 
houses are going out of date. Nobody 
will want to live in such a house. No- 
body will buy or rent such a house. No- 
body will think of building such a 
house." 

The years are steadily proving this 
forewarning to have been sound, and 
made with rare foresight. 

Insulation of homes is far from new. 
The first forerunners date to that far- 
away time when man first learned to 
interpose between himself and the ele- 
ments the protection of walls and a 
roof. The thatch roof, the origin of 
which antedates recorded history, is a 
form of insulation known to this day 
to the most primitive savage races of 
th*; earth. The mud-filled %van of an Ice- 
lanaer cabin marks another crude at- 
tempt to ease the rigors of nature. 



LOOK AHEAD! 



Wittingly or otherwise, those dim an- 
cestors incorporated in their attempts at 
insulation a basic principle of physics. 
Their primitive adaptations possess such 
merit as they have because to greater 
or less extent they provide the insulat- 
ing property that is a characteristic of 
imprisoned, still air. The possession of 
this characteristic, while varying m de- 
gree, is the common denominator of 
almost every insulating material sold 
today. 

It was Bror G. Dahlberg, pioneer de- 
veloper of cane fiber insulation and 
President of The Celotex Corporation, 
who envisioned a fibrous material which 
could be processed into a product not 
only having superior qualities of heat 
insulation but also of sufficient rigidity 
to add strength to building construc- 
tion. Further, he envisioned a material 
that could be made obnoxious to ro- 
dents, vermin and fungus growths. 
Years of experimentation were re- 
warded by the discovery that the fibrous 
material that remains when the juice 
has been squeezed from sugar cane, 
namely bagasse, could be manufactured 
into an insulating material that would 
satisfy all phases of the problem. 

On March 21, 1921, there was pro- 
duced at the Marrero plant of The Celo- 
tex Corporation, just across the Missis- 
sippi River from New Orleans, the 
largest board the world has ever kno\v'n. 
Big enough to over-top the Woolworth 
Building if stood beside it, this "board" 
was 12 feet wide and 800 feet long. 
More important in the eyes of Mr. 
Dahlberg and his associates and the eyes 
of the builders of thousands of truly 
modern homes, the "board" could be 
sawed, nailed or otherwise worked just 



like wood while offering, thickness for 
thickness, three times the insulating 
value of that older building material. 

Insulation is all but universally speci- 
fied by architects today. The great pre- 
ponderance of new homes, probably 
eight out of ten at the least, coiitain it. 
Economy as well as comfort factors are 
responsible. Depreciation is less on an 
insulated house than on an uninsulated 
one. This is another way of saying that 
the re-sale value of the former will be 
higher than that of the latter, all else 
being equal. Insulation means smaller 
fuel bills, better ventilation with or 
Avithout air-conditioning and gVeater all 
'round livability of the home in the heat 
of summer as well as the cold of winter. 

The addition of rigid cane fiber in- 
sulation to the average six-room house 
has been calculated to add about fifty 
dollars to the over-all cost of construc- 
tion of such a building.* Disregarding 
what this will mean in terms of en- 
hanced resale value of the building, 
tests show that the construction cost 
premium will have been recovered jvith- 
in less than three years — two and a half 
years, to be exact, if average figures 
showing a fuel savings expectancy of 
^20 a year, are taken. 

This explains, briefly, why Bror G. 
Dahlberg spent large sums of money to 
tell the American people from coast to 
coast that — "Heat leaking houses are 
going out of date" — Why most homes 
being built today are insulated and why 
more homes are insulated with Celotex 
than with any other building insula- 
tion. No one wants a house that is ex- 
pensive to heat. 

* After allowing for the value of struc- 
tural materials it displaces. 




t-elotex Vapor-seal Sheathing cotnes in big, 
'^■g'd, light-weight boards that go up fast — fit 
tight — stay put' Celotex keeps wind and 
Weather out, makes the building easy to heat, 
3nd saves fuel. And it's permanently pro- 
tected against termites and dry rot by the ex- 
"ustve, patented Ferox Process. 



SMALL HOMEBUILDERS YEAR BOOK^ — 1938-1939 EDiTiO 




Celotex Vapor-seal Lath, with patented beveled 
edges and shiplapped joints, provides a strong, 
solid plaster base, gives plaster greater resistance 
to cracks, prevents lath marks. And this new 
kind of lath provides the vapor barrier de- 
manded by modern science, right where it 
belongs! It's dry rot and termite proofed. 



Celotex Vapor-sea! Lath guards comfort sum- 
mer and winter, saves fuel, and permits beauti- 
ful plastering jobs that give lasting satisfaction. 
And these benefits are permanent — for Celotex 
is proofed against termites and dry rot by the 
exclusive, patented Ferox Process — and backed 
by a written life-of-building guaranteel^ 



*Tiiis guarantee, when issued, applies only within Continental United States 



*^L HOME BUILDERS YEAR B O OK— 1 9 3 8 - 1 9 3 9 EDITION 



39 








eau^aie 




t 



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f 



See Table Below for Symbols 



USE THIS TABLE AS YOUR CHECK UIST 



o 


\v ROOMS 

OUTLETS\ 

AND \ 
SWITCHES \ 


o 

s 

o 

z 

> 


2 
o 
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a. 

o 

z 

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a. 
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CEILING OUTLET 








































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WALL OUTLET 








































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CONVENIENCE 
OUTLET 








































© 


FLOOR OUTLET 








































^ 


RANGE OUTLET 








































« 


SPECIAL PURPOSE 
OUTLET 








































* 


LIGHTING SWITCH 








































^ 


MULTIPLE CONTROL 
SWITCH 








































4p 


SWITCH 8. PILOT 








































-o 


CLOCK OUTLET 








































-(H 


RADIO OUTLET 









































40 



SMALL HOME 



PERFECTS YOUR HOME PLAN 



You want your lamps to give light of even 
brilliance, uninterrupted by dimming or 
flickering when you switch on your elec- 
trical appliances. That means that you will want 
an adequate number of branch circuits to supply 
electricity to lights and appliances separately. And 
you will need to be sure that you are installing 
large enough wire for the specific uses of those 
circuits. Minimum adequacy demands a circuit 
for every 500 sq. ft. of finished floor area in the 
house, plus one or two circuits of larger wire run 
to the outlets in kitchen, laundry space, dinette 
and dining rooms where appliances will ordinarily 
be attached. Electric ranges, water heaters, auto- 
matic stokers and automatic control of oil burners 
require their own circuits of still larger wire. 

For adequate service, you must be sure to install 
at least the minimum number of lighting fixtures, 
duplex convenience oudets and switches. They 
should total: 

All Rooms: Wall szmtches: Lighting should be 
controlled by wall switches near latch side of main 
doorway. If a room has commonly-used doorways 
more than 10 ft. apart, wall switches should provide 
multiple control from both doorways. 

Kitchen: Lights: 1 ceiling-unit and wall units 
over each work area; sink, work table, serving 
counter, range, etc. Duplex coiweiiicpce outlets: 
At least 3 at elbow height at work center^. Special 
outlets for clock, refrigerator, ventilator fan, water 
heater, range, dishwasher, sink. 

Laundry Space: Lights: ceiling-unit and sup- 
plementary units over work-centers. Duplex con- 
venience outlets: 1 at each work area and a single 
outlet near tubs for washing machine. 

Dining Room; Lights: 1 ceiling-unit: wall brackets 
if desired. Duplex convenience outlets: 1 in every 
wall space where buffet or serving table may stand. 
A floor outlet under table may replace 1 of these. 

Dinette; Lights: 1 ceiling-unit or 1 wall bracket. 
Duplex convenience outlets: At least 1 above point 
where table may touch wall. 

Living Room and Bedroom: Lights: 1 ceiling-unit 
and wall brackets if desired. Duplex convenience 
outlets: No point along floor line in any wall space 
unbroken by a doorway should be more than 6 ft. 
from an outlet. And 1 in each usabJe wall space 3 
ft. or more in length at floor line. Also 1 outlet 
flush in top of mantel. 

Halls: Lights: At least 1 ceiling-unit or wall ", 
bracket for each 15 ft. or less of hall. Duplex coit- 
vcnicncc outlets: 1 for each 20 ft. or less of hall. 

Stairways: Lights: 1 at head and 1 at foot of each 'I 
stairway. A multiple switch to control both lights 
at each of these points. Pilot light on wall swUch 
at head of basement and at foot of attic stair to 
check those lights. 

Bathroom: Lights: 1 ceiling-unit and 2 wall 
brackets either side of mirror. (If room is less than 
60 sq. ft, in area, ceiling unit is unnecessary.) En- 
closed shower compartment requires special lighting. 
Duplex convenience outlets: At least 1 not near tub. 

Closets: (with floor area of 10 sq. ft. or more); 
Lights: 1 rigid fixture with pull cord control, wall 
switch or automatic door switch. 

Attic and Basement: Lights: 1 ceiling-unit near 
stairs, with additional units in each enclosed space. 
Duplex convenience outlets: At least 1. 

Entrances: Lights: 1 unit over the door or 1 on 
either side. (Porches need 1 ceiling unit for each 
100 sq. ft.) Duplex convenience outlets: 1 weather- 
proof. (Porches and terraces need 1 weatheriiroof 
outlet along each IS ft. of wall or fraction.) IVall 
switches: At least 1 inside each entrance door, 

BUILDERS YEAR BOOK 1938-1939 EDITION 




PERFECTS YOUR HOME PLAN 




o • 



See Table Below for Symbols 



USE THIS TABLE AS YOUR CHECK LIST 



-J 
o 

3 


\ ROOMS 

OUTLETs\ 

AND \ 
SWITCHES \ 


3 
o 
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a. 

o 

z 

> 


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2 


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CEILING OUTLET 








































-o 


WALL OUTLET 








































^ 


CONVENIENCE 
OUTLET 








































® 


FLOOR OUTLET 








































^ 


RANGE OUTLET 








































® 


SPECIAL PURPOSE 
OUTLET 








































^ 


LIGHTING SWITCH 








































^ 


MULTIPLE CONTROL 
SWITCH 








































*, 


SWITCH & PILOT 








































-o 


CLOCK OUTLET 








































-IeJ 


RADIO OUTLET 









































You want your lamps to give light o£ even 
brilliance, uninterrupted by dimming or 
flickering when you switch on your elec- 
trical appliances. That means that you will want 
an adequate number of branch circuits to supply 
electricity to lights and appliances separately. And 
you will need to be sure that you are installing 
large enough wire for the specific uses of those 
circuits. Minimum adequacy demands a circuit 
for every 500 sq, ft. of finished floor area in the 
house, plus one or two circuits of larger wire run 
to the outlets in kitchen, laundry space, dinette 
and dining rooms where appliances will ordinarily 
be attached. Electric ranges, water heaters, auto- 
matic stokers and automatic control of oil burners 
require their own circuits of still larger wire. 

For adequate service, you must be sure to install 
at least the minimum number of lighting fixtures, 
duplex convenience oudets and switches. They 
should total: 

AH Rooms: Wall sivttcltes: Lighting should be 
controlled by wall switches near latch side of main 
doorway. If a room has commonly-used doorways 
more than 10 ft. apart, wall switches should provide 
multiple control from both doorways. 

Kitchen: Lights: 1 ceiling-unit and wall units 
over each work area: sink, work table, serving 
counter, range, etc. Duplex convenience ontlcis: 
At least 3 at elbow height at work centers. Special 
outlets for clock, refrigerator, ventilator fan, water 
heater, range, dish-washer, sink. 

Laundry Space: Lights: ceiling-unit and sup- 
plementary units over work-centers. Duplex con- 
venience outlets: 1 at each work area and a single 
outlet near tubs for washing machine. 

Dining Room: Lights: 1 ceiling-unit; wall brackets 
if desired. Duplex convenience outlets: 1 in every 
wall space where buffet or serving table may stand. 
A floor outlet under table may replace 1 of these. 

Dinette: Lights: 1 ceiling-unit or 1 wall bracket. 
Duplex convenience outlets: At least 1 above point 
where table may touch wall. 

Living Room and Bedroom: Lights: 1 ceiling-unit 
and wall brackets if desired. Duplex convenience 
outlets: No point along floor line in any wall space 
unbroken by a doorway should be more than 6 ft. 
from an outlet. And 1 in each usable wall space 3 
ft. or more in length at 'floor line. Also 1 outlet 
flush in top of mantel. 

Halls: Lights: At least 1 ceiling-vmit or wall 
bracket for each IS ft. or less of hall. Duplex con- 
venience outlets: 1 for each 20 ft. or less of hall. 

Stairways: Lights: 1 at head and 1 at foot of each 
stairway. A multiple switch to control both lights 
at each of these points. Pilot light on wall switch 
at head of basement and at foot of attic stair to 
check those lights. 



Bathroom: Lights: 1 ceiling-unit and 2 wall 
brackets either side of mirror. (If room is less than 
60 sq. ft. in area, ceiling unit is unnecessary.) En- 
closed shower compartment requires special lighting. 
Duplex convenience outlets: At least 1 not near tub. 

Closets: (with floor area of 10 sq. ft. or more): 
Lights: 1 rigid fixture with pull cord control, wall 
switch or automatic door switch. 

Attic and Basement: Lights: 1 ceiling-unit near 
stairs, with additional units in each enclosed space. 
Duplex convenience outlets: At least 1. 

Entrances: Lights: 1 unit over the door or 1 on 
either side. (Porches need 1 ceiling unit for each 
100 sq. ft.) Duplex convenience outlets: 1 weather- 
proof. (Porches and terraces need 1 weatherproof 
outlet along each IS ft. of wall or fraction.) Jf''"'' 
switches: At least 1 inside each entrance door. 



40 



SMALL HOME BUILDERS YEAR BOOK — ^1938-1939 EDITION 





MODERN EQUIPMENT 
INCREASES THE JOY OF LIVING 

Home seekers dream no longer of castles in Spain. Today's prac- 
tical Home Makers picture a scientifically-designed structure fitted 
throughout with mechanical labor-saving devices built to give a life- 
time's service. The finest of heating plants, bathrooms, kitchen 
ranges, clothes and dishwashers, water heaters and refrigerators are 
integral parts of America's homes. 

In choosing your equipment from the many first-rate pieces of 
apparatus now on the market, balance initial cost against operating 
expense, comfort and convenience. Appreciable savings in the cost 
of operating and maintaining essential services will be found in good 
piping, good bathroom fixtures, good wiring, a good kitchen and a 
good heating plant. 

For essential in good equipment are cost and goodness, or quality. 
While attractive appearance can usually be had without additional 
first cost, the wise purchase is the one with the highest degree of 
essential goodness. 



For Free Booklets Use Coupon on Page 64 



:<^: 



I 



«■!■ 



T 




MODERN EQUIPMENT 
INCREASES THE JOY OF LIVING 

Home seekers dream no longer of castles in Spain. Today's prac- 
tical Home Makers picture a scientifically-designed structure fitted 
throughout with mechanical labor-saving devices built to give a life- 
time's service. The finest of heating plants, bathrooms, kitchen 
ranges, clothes and dishv^ashers, water heaters and refrigerators are 
integral parts of America's homes. 

In choosing your equipment from the many first-rate pieces of 
apparatus now on the market, balance initial cost against operating 
expense, comfort and convenience. Appreciable savings in the cost 
of operating and maintaining essential services will be found in good 
piping, good bathroom fixtures, good wiring, a good kitchen and a 
good heating plant. 

For essential in good equipment are cost and goodness, or quality. 
While attractive appearance can usually be had without additional 
first cost, the wise purchase is the one with the highest degree of 
essential goodness. 



For Free Booklets Use Coupon on Page 64 




ftaw 




c^ux 




ea 



t 



BY 





i 



IN the purchase or the building of a 
home there are a variety of consider- 
ations which the prospective home 
owner must decide according to his needs, 
his tastes and his pocketbook. 

The heating equipment is a matter of the 
highest consequence to which the prospec- 
tive home builder or home buyer often 
pays too little attention. 

He does not buy his heat when he ac- 
quires his home. He merely acquires the 
heating equipment. The home owner sup- 
plies his own heat year after year. His 
fuel is a continuing cost like interest and 
taxes and insurance. 

A warm house in cold weather is an in- 
dispensable requisite to the health and 
comfort of the occupants. No amount of 
pleasing color schemes, labor saving gadg- 
ets and fine furniture will compensate for 
the discomforts of faulty or insufficient or 
undependable heat. 

The annual cost of home heating ought 
to be carefully budgeted with an eye to 
the comparative operating costs of various 
types of house heating equipment and the 
choice of fuels. 

Wood was the fuel supply of our fore- 
fathers. Wood fueled the first steam en- 
gine and Robert Fulton's steamboat and 
heated the homes of earlier generations. 
Today a wood-burning fireplace is a 
charming feature of countless homes, but 
in northern climates few home owners 
would want to rely solely on wood for 
their heat. 

Bituminous coal, first mined in America 
more than a century ago, and now avail- 
able in virtually inexhaustible abundance, 
has long been the nation's principal fuel 
medium, supplemented in recent days by 
oil and gas and electric power. 

Today the prospective home owner may 
take his choice when it comes to the ques- 
tion of heat. He may burn wood or coal 
or oil or gas, or, if money is no object and 
it suits his fancy, he may "burn" electricity 
for his heat. 

In making his choice the home owner 
will do well to fully acquaint himself with 
the facts and the comparative advantages 
and comparative costs of the various fuels, 
for his particular home in his particular 
location and with relation to his needs. 

Each fuel has its own "talking points," 
hut the important thing for the home 
owner is to get the facts. 




There is po coal shoveling in this coal healed 

basement. The Stoker does all the Worl;. 

Ash Removal is just as simple as Stoking. 

Because bituminous coal is not a new 
fuel some persons have the idea that it is 
not a modern fuel. That is a mistake. 
Coal has been "modernized" along with 
almost everything else. That means that 
coal today is scientifically mined, treated, 
graded, shipped and delivered (frequently 
packaged) in keeping with modern re- 
quirements. 

The first and foremost consideration in 
connection with the bituminous coal in- 
dustry is the human element. Some 500,- 
000 miners are employed during normal 
times. There are at least that many more 
men employed indirectly, such as retail 
coal merchants, their employees, railroad 
employees directly dependent on the move- 
ment of coal, etc. Many are employed in- 
directly in manufacturing plants which 
supply the coal mines, as well as profes- 
sional persons such as doctors, teachers, 
merchants, and so on. Thus the bitu- 
minous coal industry occupies an important 
place in the economic picture of this coun- 
try. Its purchasing power when the mines 
are operating is enormous. Labor is the 
main factor. Sixty cents out of every dollar 
taken in for the sale of coal goes directly 
to mine labor. 

Because bituminous coal plays so large 
a part in industry, some persons have the 
idea that coal is only an industrial fuel. 
That is a mistake. Coal for a heating 
plant in the home is in first place. 

There is a lot of emphasis on labor sav- 



small home builders year book — 1938-1939 edition 



"Executive Secretary, National Coal Association 



ing in the home, avoidance of drudgery — 
we talk of automatic this and that. To 
think of coal in terms of frequent journeys 
to the basement is unnecessary. The fact 
is that coal-firing, even "by hand," in the 
modern coal furnace is a very different 
proposition today from a generation ago. 
If the home owner wishes, he may obtain 
"automatic" coal-firing at no more cost, 
and often at less cost, than for automatic 
heat of any other type of fuel and his au- 
tomatic coal-firing appliances — the -house- 
hold type coal stoker — will be as depend- 
able as any other. 

The small home without basement can 
now have an abundance of heat by the use 
of the fireplace heater, to which radiators 
are connected, simple in design, easy to 
install, inexpensive and efficient. No more 
trouble than the building of the fire in the 
open grate- 
When it comes to the cost of his fuel 
supply the home owner will do well to re- 
member that it is not the unit cost that 
counts, not the per ton or per gallon or per 
..cubic foot price, but the cost of his total 
"mileage" per year. 

The architect who designs the house, the 
contractor who builds it, each has expert 
ideas and does his part to make it the best 
of its type. But they are not going to live 
in it: they are not going to pay for it, and 
they can't know the financial limit of the 
average person to pay for his house and 
its maintenance. 

The increased "efficiency" of coal has 
been tremendous during the past two dec- 
ades. This means to the owner of a mod- 
ern home with modern heating equipment 
that two tons of coal today will supply him 
with the same amount of heat as three tons 
did a decade ago. 

In further consideration of the house 
heating question, the prospective home 
owner will be confronted with a choice as 
between various types of fuels. If he con- 
cludes to fuel his burner with bituminous 
coal, he will discover, if he does not al- 
ready now, that for the best heating re- 
sults he must have the most efficient and 
economical combustion of his fuel, and 
that means the kind of heating equipment 
best adapted to the particular fuel to be 
burned in it. 

The final questions in his mind should 
be — What do I want? What can I afford? 
What shall I install to save money? Re- 
liable cost figures are available. 

43 



Be Sure Your 
New Home 

Is Equipped with 

These Z Fans 




for Summer 
Cooling Comfort 

These large-capacity, quiet 
fans, wHen turned on after sun- 
down, quickly force out the hot 
air and draw in the cool night 
air through open windows in 
the lower rooms, assuring cool 
comfort all summer. A feature 
that will make your home dif- 
ferent and better. Write for 
Booklet 3085. 




Kitchen FAN 



Quickly catches the eye of the 
housewife. Removes cooking 
odors. Keeps kitchen well ven- 
tilated. Furnished complete 
with wall case for easy installa- 
tion. No modern home should 
be without one. Write for Bul- 
letin 2892. 

BUFFALO FORGE COMPANY 

481 Broadway Buffalo, N. Y. 

Branch Engineering Offices in Principal Cities 

In Canada: Canadian Blower and Forge Co., Ltd., 

Kitchener, Ont. 



44 



THE HUNT FaR 




eat 



^<^aitftd \^^o^m.T(^tt 



WHEN you can answer this 
question: "What quality of 
comfort do I want in my new 
house?" you can greatly simplify your 
problem of selecting a satisfactory heating 
or air conditioning system. For there are 
so many types and grades of systems from 
which to choose that the easiest way to 
select one is to work backwards from the 
results you want to secure, to the particu- 
lar kind of system that will produce these 
results most economically. 

To keep things clear, let us recall that 
heating and air conditiotjing are the same 
thing, up to a point, and that air condi- 
tioning goes beyond heating to add other 
elements which contribute to comfort and 
health. Heating merely provides warmth 
in winter; winter air conditioning add; 
moisture to the air to keep our persons 
and possessions from drying out, it keeps 
the air in gende circulation to prevent stag- 
nation and it cleans the air periodically. 

What people often think of as air con- 
ditioning — -summer cooling — is merely a 
further development of winter air condi- 
tioning. Summer air conditioning keeps 
indoor air in motion and keeps it clean, 
just as in winter, so when you have winter 
air conditioning you have part of the things 
needed for summer comfort. But instead 
of adding moisture to the air, summer 
treatment in most part's of the country 
seeks to remove excessive moisture, for this 
has a cooling effect on the body and pro- 
duces comfort. Cooling the air is the last 
step in complete air conditioning. It is 
often too costly for the moderate house. 

With these distinctions clear it is pos- 
sible to begin organizing your desires. 
There are five *'Ifs" to answer: 

(1) // yoii want any form of air condi- 
tioning for more than one or two rooms 
the system you choose must include sheet 
metal ducts through which air can be 
moved from the plant in the basement or 
utility room, to outlet grilles in the walls 
of each room where conditioned air is 
wanted, with other ducts to return the air 
from the floor of the principal rooms back 
to the central unit. 

This usually means a system that is a 
modern development of the familiar warm 
air furnace that today uses smaller ducts 






and an electric blower to keep the air in 
motion. Such an installation is called a 
"Direct Fired," or warm air furnace sys- 
tem. The same results may also be ob- 
tained with an "Indirect" system which 
uses a steam or hot water boiler to heat all 
the air passing around coils in the base- 
ment ductwork. 




National Humbing and Heating Industries Bureau. 

Placed under a window a radiator meets the 

coid where the cold comes in, thuj providing 

draftless heating and sun-like radiant heat, as 

well as being entirely out of the way. 



(2) 7/ you want the benefits of radiant 
heat you must choose a syst-'ti that em- 
ploys radiators. Radiant herf^ is like the 
warmth of the sun or the glow from a fire- 
place or hot stove. You feel it on your 
body on the side that is turned toward the 
heat. It I. particularly desirable when 
radiators can be placed under windows 
along cold walls, for then they offset the 
.tendency of these cold surfaces to rob heat 
from the body. Of course radiators ef- 
fectively heat the whole room, too, but the 
chief difference between this type of system 
and warm air heating lies in the direct 
warming effect of radiant heat. 

(3) // you want both radiant heat and 
warm conditioned air in winter the system 
you should choose is known as a "Split" 
system, which divides the heating job be- 
tween radiators and warm, treated air. In 
this system you use radiators in the bath- 
rooms, the kitchen and garage (if the lat- 
ter must be heated) because it is not desir- 
able to recirculate air from these rooms j 
back to the central plant. In addition you 
may use some radiators in living rooms 
or especially cold rooms for their radiant 
heating value. Then you provide ducts to 
all the rooms in which conditioned air is 
wanted, winter or summer or both, and 
warm and clean the air in a cabinet con- 



SMALL HOME BUILDERS YEAR BOOK 1938-1939 EDITION' 



■J 



Be Sure Your 
New Home 

Is Equipped with 

These 2 Fans 




for Summer 
Cooling Comfort 

These large-capacity, quiet 
fans, wHen turned on after sun- 
down, quickly force out the hot 
air and draw in the cool night 
air through open windows in 
the lower rooms, assuring cool 
comfort all summer. A feature 
that will make your home dif- 
ferent and better. Write for 
Booklet 3085. 




Kitchen FAN 



Quickly catches the eye of the 
housewife. Removes cooking 
odors. Keeps kitchen well ven- 
tilated. Furnished complete 
with wall case for easy installa- 
tion. No modern home should 
be without one. Write for Bul- 
letin 2892. 

BUFFALO FORGE COMPANY 

481 Broadway BuHalD, N. Y. 

Branch Engineering Offices in Principal Cities 

In Canada: Canadian Blower and Forge Co., Ltd., 

Kitchener, OnL 




THE HUNT FOR 



eat 



WHEN you can answer this 
question: "What quality oJ; 
comfort do I \\'ant in my new 
house.?" you can greatly simplify your 
problem of selecting a satisfactory heating 
or air conditioning system. For there are 
so many types and grades of systems from 
which to choose that the easiest way to 
select one is to work backwards from the 
results you want to secure, to the particu- 
lar kind of system that will produce these 
results most economically. 

To keep things clear, let us recall that 
heating and air conditioning are the same 
thing, up to a point, and that air condi- 
tioning goes beyond heating to add other 
elements which contribute to comfort and 
health. Heating merely provides warmth 
in winter; winter air conditioning addt 
moisture to the air to keep our persons 
and possessions from drying out, it keeps 
the air in gentle circulation to prevent stag- 
nation and it cleans the air periodically. 

What people often think of as air con- 
ditioning — summer cooling — is merely a 
further development of winter air condi- 
tioning. Summer air conditioning keeps 
"indoor air in motion and keeps it clean, 
just as in winter, so when you have winter 
air conditioning you have part of the things 
needed for summer comfort. But instead 
of adding moisture to the air, summer 
treatment in most parts of the country 
seeks to remove excessive moisture, for this 
has a cooling effect on the body and pro- 
duces comfort. Cooling the air is the last 
step in complete air conditioning. It is 
often too costly for the moderate house. 

With these distinctions clear it is pos- 
sible to begin organizing your desires. 
There are five "Ifs" to answer: 

(1) // you want any form of air condi- 
tioning for more than one or two rooms 
the system you choose must include sheet 
metal ducts through which air can be 
moved from the plant in the basement or 
utility room, to outlet grilles in the walls 
of each room where conditioned air is 
wanted, with other ducts to return the air 
from the floor of the principal rooms back 
to the central unit. 

This usually means a system that is a 
modern development of the familiar warm 
air furnace that today uses smaller ducts 




ai^ft 



cL \^^c 



af4tj:at 



t 



and an electric blower to keep the air in 
motion. Such an installation is called a 
"Direct Fired," or warm air furnace sys- 
tem. The same results may also be ob 
tained with an "Indirect" system which 
uses a steam or hot water boiler to heat all 
the air passing around coils in the base- 
ment ductwork. 




National I'luinbingancUIfatiiigludiistsios Bureau. 

Placed under a window a radiator meets the 

cold where the cold comes in, thus providing 

draftless heating and sun-like radiant heat, as 

well as being entirely out of the way. 

(2) // yoH want the benefits of radiant 
heat you must choose a system that eni 
ploys radiators. Radiant hea>; is like the 
warmth of the sun or the glow from a fire 
place or hot stove. You feel it on your 
body on the side that is turned toward the 
heat. It .... particularly desirable when 
radiators can be placed under windows 
along cold walls, for then they offset the 
tendency of these cold surfaces to rob heat 
from the body. Of course radiators ef- 
fectively heat the whole room, too, but the 
chief difference between this type of system 
and warm air heating lies in the direct 
warming eff'ect of radiant heat. 

(3) // you want both radiant heat and 
warm conditioned air in winter the system 
you should choose is known as a "Split" 
system, which divides the heating job be- 
tween radiators and warm, treated air. In 
this system you use radiators in the bath- 
rooms, the kitchen and garage (if the lat- 
ter must be heated) because it is not desir- 
able to recirculate air from these rooms 
back to the central plant. In addition you 
may use some radiators in living rooms 
or especially cold rooms for their radiant 
heating value. Then you provide ducts to 
all the rooms in which conditioned air is 
wanted, winter or summer or both, and 
warm and clean the air in a cabinet cour 



nected to the water or steam boiler in the 
basement or utility room. 

(4) // you want to get your domestic 
hot water supply from the same source as 
your house heat, you will need a system 
that uses a steam or hot water boiler, 
rather than a warm air furnace. Of course, 
with the latter you can always have a 
separate pot stove, or an independent water 
heater using gas, oil or electricity. 

(5) if you want really steady tempera- 
tures, and particularly if you want to keep 
the air properly humidified in winter, your 
system should be automatically controlled 
by a sensitive thermostat and a humidistat. 
Automatic controls may be used^ — in fact 
are highly desirable — with even a hand 
fired boiler or furnace, for they also save 
fuel and thus really pay for themselves. 

Of course, comfort is not the only factor 
to be considered by moist families. Con- 
venience and economy are usually wanted 
as well. 

Automatic Controls 

Convenience can be had in part by using 
automatic controls, already recommended 
for both comfort and economy, and in part 
by the kind of fuel you use. Bear in mind 
that the quality of comfort is not effected 
by your choice of fuel. You can be just as 



warm burning old newspapers or kindling 
wood as you can be with coal, coke, oil, gas 
or electricity. 

If you allow maximum convenience to 
govern, then one of the so-called fully auto- 
matic fuels should be used: electricity, gas 
or oil. These three are always employed 
under the control of autorhatic devices. 

But if solid fuels — bituminous coal, an- 
thracite or coke — are wanted for their 
economy, your choice lies between hand 
firing, an automatic stoker, or a boiler or 
furnace that holds a reserve supply of fuel 
(called a magazine feed unit) to lessen the 
frequency of shovelling fuel. With an au- 
tomatic stoker no labor is involved except 
carrying out the ashes. With magazine 
type boilers or furnaces, fuel need be sup- 
plied only once in 24 to 56 hours, depend- , 
ing on weather conditions. 

With all solid fuels, labor can be greatly 
reduced by proper design of the fuel bin, 
using a sloping bottom and dust-tight 
walls. Ash dust can be eliminated by an 
ash spray, to be used before removing them 
from the furnace. These advances add 
only |25 to $40 to the cost of old-fashioned 
methods and vastly improve the conven- 
ience and desirability of solid fuels. 

As for summer comfort, you should 



likewise decide on how far you want to 
go, now or later, toward complete year 
around air conditioning, including me- 
chanical refrigeration for cooling. 

Summer Comfort 

You can get a great deal of summer com- 
fort with an attic fan costing around $150 
to draw the cool night air through the 
house in preparation for the torrid day to 
follow. If you have a well supplying 
ample cold water you can have a cooling 
system for a few hundred dollars. Or, in 
humid climates, you might consider one 
of the newest air drying devices, called a 
"dehumidifier" which answers the old dis- 
comfort complaint "it isn't the heat, it's 
the humidity." They are still rather ex- 
pensive, but cost less than mechanical re- 
frigeration. 

Thus, as a home owner, you have quite 
a sufficient task to decide what results you 
desire to get out of your heating and air 
conditioning equipment. The further prob- 
lem of selecting the final units to buy is 
one that should be solved with the help of 
experts. When you know what you want, 
and what you can pay for it, your advisor 
can quickly limit your final choice to a 
few combinations of units that wilk best 
meet your needs. 






yX ': 



NOW A 



HOLLAND 
FURNACE 



SPECIALLY ENGINEERED 
F&R SMALL HOMES 

With Up to 3 Years to Pay 




{Slightly 
Higher H^est 
of Rocklet) 



At Lowest Cost Brings You Features Which Have Made Holland 
Furnaces Famous Everywhere for Home Heating Efficiency 

IN LINE with the nation's drive 
to stimulate home building and 



modernizing through reduced costs, 
Holland has developed this low 
priced furnace. Only Holland's un- 
equalled engineering facilities and 30 
years specialized experience in home 
heating could produce a furnace of 
such quality at such low cost. Note 
the extra value features engineered 
into the Holland. They combine to 
form the exclusive Holland combus- 
tion principle of amazing efficiency. 



The fire is hottest directly against the 
casting, insuring more useable heat 
from everyounce of coal. Installed the 
scientific Holland way, this furnace 
cannot fail to give efficient heating 
service for many years to come. What- 
ever your heating and air condition- 
ing needs, write Holland first. Mail 
coupon for complete information. 

FURNACE COMPANY 

HOLLAND, MICH. 

Hfarld's Largest Installers of Home Heating 
and Air Conditioning Systems 



HOLLAND 



ALL THESE FEATURES ... IN NO OTHER LOW PRICED FURNACE! 







HOLLAND FURNACE COMPANY. Dept. SHB-12, Holland, Michigan 
Rush me informaiion on subject checked below. 

□ New Low Cost Holfand Furnace D Free Heating Plant Inspection 
n Automatic Oi! Burners D Automatic Stoker 

□ Automatic-Furnace Air Conditioner for Oi! or Gas 



FUEL SAVING 
CONE-SHAPED GRATE 



TWO-PIECE 
SLOTTED FIRE-POT 



HOLLAND'S EXCLUSIVE 
COMBUSTION PRINOPLE 



NAME 

ADDRESS , 

CITY STATE. 



44 



SMALL HOME BUILDERS YEAR BOOK 1938-1939 EDITION 



^^^ALL HOME BUILDERS YEAR B O O K — 1 9 3 8 - 1 9 3 9 EDITION 



45 



-^ "1 



i^ 



IT IS EASY TO HAVE AN 




Lccea 



t 



MODERNIZE 
ELECTRIFY 



l\ucki 




IN YOUR HOME 

By Garduer Boyd 



THE modern home-maker knows 
that her kitchen must be equipped 
for three major tasks — the storage 
and preparation of food, the cooking and 
serving of that food, and the washing of 
dishes. The electric kitchen is planned 
with these three operations in mind. 

To each of these tasks a "work center" 
is assigned. At each center the equiptnent 
is so arranged that the work can be carried 
on with utmost dispatch and ease. The 
location of these three planned centers in 
the kitchen, so that the work flows in an 
orderly and efficient manner, constitutes 
the modern planned kitchen. 

Food Storage and Preparation 
Since the function of the kitchen is to 
provide facilities for preparing meals, the 
first work center is the one at which the 
preparation of meals begins. It includes 
the electric refrigerator, storage space for 
supplies not requiring cold storage and for 
small equipment, and a convenient shelf 
or counter on which the housewife may 
prepare food as she takes it from storage. 
With the refrigerator close to the out- 
side door, it is simple to place eggs, meat, 
milk, fruit and other perishables directly 
in it as they are brought into the house, 
without waste motion. Here they keep 




Modern Electric Kitchen in Small Home 



safely until needed, because the electric re- 
frigerator holds its temperature constantly 
below 50 degrees (the safety limit for keep- 
ing foods), regardless of room temperature. 

Cleaning and Dishwashing 
The cleaning and dishwashing center 
should be next to the preparation center. 
This places the sink in a convenient posi- 
tion when water is needed to prepare food 
for cooking. Joined to the sink is the elec- 
tric dishwasher. Its convenience and effi- 
ciency make it a desirable installation in 
any home. With its help, dishes are 
washed far more thoroughly and easier. 
No soaking of hands in hot greasy suds; 
no frequent emptying of dishpans to refill 
with clean water. The automatic dish- 
washer uses water far hotter than the 
hands can stand, important to sanitation. 
The remaining space in this second work 
center is occupied by a work counter, with 
storage cupboards and an electrically- 
heated towel dryer below counter and sink. 

Cooling and Serving 

The cooking and serving center is placed 
at the other side of the cleaning *center. 
Its most important unit, the electric range, 
should stand close to the door leading into 
the dining room, so that food can be car- 



ried from range to table with the greatest 
convenience. Electric cooking has become 
justifiably popular because it gives • the 
home-maker fast, clean and economical 
cooking, with the least possible effort on 
her part. The automatic features of the 
modern electric range give the home-maker 
more freedom from the kitchen and more 
flexibility as to time spent in it- 
Bet ween range and sink is a work 
counter with storage cabinets beneath, 
while wall cabinets may extend the entire 
length of the center above. 

This completes th, arrangement of the> 
three work centers. This sequence may be , 
either in the form of the letter U (the most 
desirable plan), or in the form of an L, or 
in a straight line. Modifications of this 
arrangement are sometimes unavoidable if 
doors and windows are badly placed. 
Work Counters 
The work counters Avhich fill the space 
between refrigerator and sink and between 
sink and range should stand at the same 
height as the top of the range and sink, to 
which they should be closely joined, Be^ 
neath them will be base cabinets, built to 
stand on the floor. Standard height for 
these cabinets is 36 inches thus allowing 
for a work counter 1 J4 inches thick and a 4 




Food Storage-Preparation Center 



46 



m: 



OISH TOWELS 



TOWEL OUYEtt 

oa sToeAQE. 



REFUSE 
C0t4T 



DISHWASHER 



SERVING 
DISHES 



PACKAGED FOODS 



COFFEE TEA ETC 



CONDIMENTS 

911 



ELECTRIC 
"APPLlkwCES" 



5LICIHG eOAOP 



CUTLERY 


COOKING 
TOOLS 


BeeAO & 

CAKE 


SERVING 
80WLS 


POTS a. 


PANS 



d) iti <t> (ti il> <t> (D 



POTS 1 PANS 



EXTBA 
OVEN EOUIR 



Cleaning and Dishwashing Center Coolting-Serving Center 

SMALL HOME BUILDERS YEAR BOOK 1938-1939 EDITION 






IT IS EASY TO HAVE AN 




LUCft 



t 



MODERNIZE 
ELECTRIFY 



l\Ltckeft 




IN YOUR HOME 

By Gardner Itoyd 




THE modern home-maker knows 
that her kitchen must be equipped 
for three major tasks — the storage 
and preparation of food, the cooking and 
serving of that food, and the washing of 
dishes. The electric kitchen is planned 
with these three operations in mind. 

To each of these tasks a "work center" 
is assigned. At each center the equipment 
is so arranged that the work can be carried 
on with utmost dispatch and ease. The 
location of these three planned centers in 
the kitchen, so that the work flows in an 
orderly and efficient manner, constitutes 
the modern planned kitchen. 

Food Storage and Preparation 

Since the function of the kitchen is to 
provide facilities for preparing meals, the 
first work center is the one at which the 
preparation of meals begins. It includes 
the electric refrigerator, storage space for 
supplies not requiring cold storage and for 
small equipment, and a convenient shelf 
or counter on which the housewife may 
prepare food as she takes it from storage. 

With the refrigerator close to the out- 
side door, it is simple to place eggs, meat, 
milk, fruit and other perishables direcdy 
in it as they are brought into the house, 
without waste motion. Here they keep 



Modern Eleclric Kifchen in Small Home 



safely until needed, because the electric re- 
frigerator holds its temperature constandy 
below 50 degrees (the safety limit for keep- 
ing foods), regardless of room temperature. 

Cleaning and Dishwashing 
The cleaning and dishwashing center 
should be next to the preparation center. 
This places the sink in a convenient posi- 
tion when water is needed to prepare food 
for cooking. Joined to the sink is the elec- 
tric dishwasher. Its convenience and effi- 
ciency make it a desirable installation in 
any home. With its help, dishes are 
washed far more thoroughly and easier. 
No soaking of hands in hot greasy suds; 
no frequent emptying of dishpans to refill 
with clean water. The automatic dish- 
washer uses water far hotter than the 
hands can stand, important to sanitation. 
The remaining space in this second work 
center is occupied by a work counter, with 
storage cupboards and an electrically- 
heated towel dryer below counter and sink. 

Cooling and Serving 
The cooking and serving center is placed 
at the other side of the cleaning center. 
Its most important unit, the electric range, 
should stand close to the door leading into 
the dining room, so that food can be car- 



ried from range to table with the greatest 
convenience. Electric cooking has become 
justifiably popular because it gives the 
home-maker fast, clean and economical 
cooking, with the least possible effort on 
her part. The automatic features of the 
modern electric range give the home-maker 
more freedom from the kitchen and more 
flexibility as to time spent in it. 

Between range and sink is a work 
counter with storage cabinets beneath, 
while wall cabinets may extend the entire 
length of the center ^bove. 

This completes th_ arrangement of the 
three work centers. This sequence may be 
either in the form of the letter U (the most 
desirable plan), or in the form of an L, or 
in a straight line. Modifications of this 
arrangement are sometimes unavoidable if 
doors and windows are badly placed, 
Work Counters 

The work counters which fill the space, 
between refrigerator and sink and between 
sink and range should stand at the same 
height as the top of tbe range and sink, to 
which they should be closely joined. Be- 
neath them will be base cabinets, built to 
stand on the floor. Standard height for 
these cabinets is 36 inches thus allowing 
for a work counter 1 Yi inches thick and a 4 



CAMMING EQUIP 



JELLIES 

canTjed 



JAMS 
FRUIT 



CANNED 



FOODS & 

PACKAGED 
FOODS 

OAKIKJG 
INGBE0IENT5 

^COnB MENfs" 



VEGETABLES 



& GLASSWARE 



/pD 




■SLICING BOAPO 



VEGETABLES 



FLOUQ-SUGAO 



BOWLS & 
SAUCE PANS 



MIXIMG EQUIP 



MIXER PARTS 



BAKING PANS 



Food Storage-Preparation Center 



m: 



OISH TOWELS 



TOWEL OBVEtt 
OR 5T0RAGL 



REFUSE 
GOUT 



DISHWASHER 



SERymG_ 
_ PISH E.S_ 

eo 



PACKAGED FOODS 



coffee tea etc 
"conoi'ments'"" 

Oil 



DISHES 

DISHES 



" XT 



ELECTRIC _ 
"APPLikwCEs" 



SLICING BOARD 



CUTLCRY 


COOKING 
TOOLS 


BSEAO K 
CAHE 


SERVIMG 
80WLS 


POTS & 


PANS 



(t Ct) (1) (t> <^ (t) (^ 



POTS & PANS 



46 



Cleaning and Dishwashing Center Cooking-Serving Center 

SMALL HOME BUILDERS YEAR BOOK — 1938-1939 EDITION 



r 



I 

I 

\ 




square feet of upper cabinets for each ad- 
ditional bedroom in the house. A tall 
storage cabinet close to the range, extend- 
ing from floor to ceiling, offers special con- 
veniences for storing utensils. 

Popular acceptance of kitchen cabinets 
and electrical equipment has been such 
that the cost of the modern alhelectric 



Range (Cooking) Center 
■ft 

inch toe space at the floor line. The counter 

itself should be 25 inches from the front to 

back, and the cabinets from 22 to 24 Vi 

inches deep. Wall cabinets are 16 inches 

deep, and are set high enough so as not to 

interfere with the work space beneath — at 

least 16 inches above the counter. 

Cabinet Space 

A common way to figure the amount of 
cabinet space required is in relation to the 
number of bedrooms, since this indicates 
the normal occupancy of the house. A 
house of two bedrooms should have at 
least 30 square feet of upper cabinet space, 
with base cabinets beneath these upper 
cabinets where possible. Add six more 




Its flameless heat makes possible the most 
complete insulation, and an outer steel cas- 
ing insures beauty, durability and cleanli- 
ness. The electric water heater may be 
placed with perfect safety anywhere. It 
can be located in the basement or utility 
room, an advantage in the South and 
SouthxA'est where the trend is toward base- 
mcndess houses. Because it is compact it 
can be placed in the kitchen, where its ap- 
pearance harmonizes with other equip- 
ment. The ideal location is near the 
Cleaning Center, so that there will be the 
shortest amount of piping and the least 
loss of heat. 



Sink (Cleaning) Center 

kitchen is today entirely in keeping with 
the most modest home. 

Electric Water Heaters 
Plenty of hot water is one of the basic 
requirements of modern living. One of 
the most satisfactory developments to meet 
this is the automatic electric water heater. 
No source of hot water is more reliable. 




Storage (Preservation) Center 



HOTPOINT LOW-COST ELECTRIC KITCHENS 




FOR BUILDERS— 
14 complelely 
detailed plans 
oi all-electiic 
kitchens for 
Bureau Homes 

FREE 
BOOKLETS! 

FOR OWNERS— 

This gay book 
oi all - electric 
kitchens shows 
color schemes 
and new ideas 



Simply modi the coupon below for your 
copy of Hotpoint's book of kitchens 
'Designed for Living." ^^^ 



SPECIALLY PLANNED 
FOR BUREAU HOMES 

You can have a complete All-Electric Kitchen on the Hotpoint 
Friendly Finance Plan for as little as $4.00 weekly. Now your Small 
Home budget can easily provide you with the new cleanliness, new 
convenience, and new comfort of a Hotpoint All-Electric Kitchen. 
There is a free book for you and a free book for your builder. They 
are illustrated and described at the left. Ask your builder to show 
you his copy^ — or if he does not already have one, write his nanie and 
address in the proper space on the coupon below. He will receive his 
copy immediately. Remember, an electric kitchen in your new home 
will make it truly modern, will save you money, time, and effort. 



Cut here 



RANG E S 
WASHERS, 
IRONERS 



IMjiskll^ 



TO EDISON GENERAL ELECTRIC 
APPLIANCE COMPANY, INC. 
■ 5860 W. Taylor Street 
Chicago, Illinois 



CCi Please send "DESIGNED for LIVING" 



U 



g Owner's Name 
l> Address 

Ocity ;.. 



REFRIGERATORS 
WATER HEATERS 

DISHWASHER. SINKS 

Piea"se~sencrhim ~'300K ~f~PLANS" 



3 s 

O r^ Contractor's Name 

is '3 

a CQ Address 

U O City 



1 SMALL HOME BUILDERS YEAR B O O K — 1 9 3 8 - 1 9 3 9 EDITION 

1 



47 



r 




>cam»le^ OF GAS FOR THE 4 BIG JOBS 



Archit'ecfs 

HAYS, SIMPSON & HUNSICKER 

7829 EUCLID AVENUE 

CLEVELAND. OHIO 




EQUIPMENT: 

1 . Dryer Gas Heated 

2. Ironer Gas Heated 

3. Hot Plate Gas Heated 

4. Range Gas Heated 

5. Plate Warmer Gas Heated 

6. Incinerator Gas Fired 

7. Cooling Unit Gas Fired 

8. Refrigerator Gas Fired 

9. Hot Water Heater ■! . . .Gas Fired 

10. Air Conditioning Unit Gas Fired 



EQUIPMENT: 



Refrigerator 

Range 

Washer 

Dryer 

Ironer 

Heating and Air Conditioning 

Hot Water Heater 




Architect 
• FRANK S. DOUGHERTY 
1 100 WOODLAWN AVENUE 
WILMINGTON, DELAWARE 



SMALL HOME BUILDERS YEAR BOOK — 1938-1939 EDITION 



n^" 




FOR THE 4 BIG JOBS 



By J. W. WEST, Jr., Director 
Home Appliance Planning Bureau, American Gas Association 




Seal of Apf'roz'al of 
the Test ill fi Labora- 
tories of the Amer- 
ican Gas Association. 



GAS has come into its own as the 
logical fuel for Cooking, Water 
Heating, Refrigeration, and 
House Heating. Engineering science has 
■developed automatic appliances of every 
type and size so that ideal equipment is 
everywhere available to do these Big Jobs 
in every home. 

Modern gas equipment is reasonably 
priced. It operates without noise; has no 
moving parts needing service and repairs; 
and, because it doesn't wear out, it gives 

almost lifetime service. 

•t 

COOKING 





Simple in design and simple to operate, 
the modern automatic gas range provides 
instantly any degree of heat wanted. It is 
heavily insulated to save fuel (and to keep 
your kitchen cool). Automatic features, 
controlled by a touch of your finger, in- 
clude top-burner and oven lighting, and to 
regulated-oven heating to assure just the 
right cooking temperature. There are 
Smokeless broilers and simmer-save top 
burners that give you speedy, adjustable 
and economical clean heat. 

And for those who v\'ant the economy 
and convenience of complete automatic 
time-control for absentee-cooking, the finer 
ranges offer the greatest values for a long 
time investment. Such ranges pay for 
themselves in savings. 

WATER HEATING 

Full automatic water heaters provide per- 
fect service to suit every house and family. 
Because of improvements in design and 
insulation they use surprisingly little gas. 



>MALL HOME BUILDERS YEAR BOO 



From the many 
different types — 
standard to table 
t o p — y o u c a n 
select a heater that 
will give a meas- 
ured amount of 
hot water at a 
measured cost, or 
one that will al- 
ways supply all 
the hot water your 
family needs. 

Your local gas 
company's experts 
can help you to 
pick out exactly 
the water heater 
that will suit your 
house, your family and your pocketbook. 

REFRIGERATION 

The gas refrigerator is noted for depend- 
able performance, quiet operation and real 
economy, for maintenance and operating 
costs are indeed low. 

The freezing 
unit provides con- 
trolled cooling 
throughout the 
food storage space. 
At a turn of a 
knob defrosting 
and refreezing are 
automatic. More- 
over, the gas re- 
frigerator has every 
modern device 
and improvement 
— • interior light- 
ing; push-or-puU 
door latch; ice- 
trays released by triggers; maximum stor- 
age space. 

Don't buy too small a refrigerator to 
save on the purchase price. There isn't 
enough difference in operating costs to 
make up for the inconvenience of restricted 
storage space and too few ice cubes. 

HOUSE HEATING 

Gas is the ideal fuel for a heating plant 
designed to deliver automatically to every 
room in your house clean, odorless heat, to 
start quickly in the morning and to make 
quick temperature changes to meet variable 
weather. For gas provides clean quick 

K— 1938-1939 EDITION 




heat. It needs no storage space, no han- 
dling, no service^and there is always 
enough. As you pay for it after use- — ^not 
before— it is in every way the best heat- 
ing buy for your money. 

Because of economies from new types 
of burners operating under thermostatic 
control and specially low meter rates for 
heating in most localities, gas fuel bills are 
comparable to any kind of fuel. 

Size for size the equipment rates less 
space than any other. This is of real im- 
portance to the owner of the small house. 
There are 14 types and many sizes of gas 
heating equipment (including burners to 
convert your present furnace), so it is easy 
to find the ideal unit for your house. 

Gas is peculiarly fitted for air condition- 
ing equipment for houses. The accompany- 
ing illustration indicates how little space a 
gas-fired air-conditioner takes. 

As only the gas supply needs regular 
tion automatic controls are very simple. As * 
most controls include a clock thermostat, 
there is litde need for going near the 
heating plant. Periodic service provided 
free by the gas company covers that. 

As there are many factors that influence 
the selection of heating equipment— sizp 
and shape of house, climate, owner prefer- 
ences, etc. — you should always get the local 
gas company to help you choose the right 
kind and size. An accurate survey of heat 
requirements is absolutely necessary. 




mmutitm 



74^, 




th 



REACHES NEW HEIGHTS IN BEAUTY AND EFFICIENCY 



BECAUSE America is a nation of 
bathers, our bathrooms are the 
envy of the world, and a symbol of 
high standards of living. No room in your 
home is- as typical of the times as the mod- 
ern bathroom, with its free use of color in 
fixtures, fittings, wall and floor coverings. 
Every American would like to have his 
own bathroom. In the small house this 
may not be possible, but there should be 
a bathroom for every two bedrooms, and a 
powder room, or basement lavatory. 

ARRANGEMENT— 
Some of the many prac- 
tical arrangements of fix- 
tures in rectangular and 
irregular spaces (as small 
as five feet square) that 
give variety and charm to 
the bathroom are illus- 
trated on this page. 

Never place the tub under the window. 
It is difficult to open the window, and the 
bather is subject to drafts. 
F/Xrt7i?E5— There 
are so many lovely mod- 
ern bathroom fixtures that 
the task of selection is a 
delightful one. Visit as 
many manufacturers' 
showrooms as possible 
with your plumbing contractor or architect. 
After an extensive preview, you will be 
in position to decide on colored plumbing 
fixtures. While it is true that these cost 










/■^> 




f 


fjp=? 


' 2 




somewhat more than the regulation white, 
this is only a small part of the total cost of 
any bathroom. Used correctly, color in 
fixtures is a most econom- 
ical way to attain indi- 
viduality. 

After determining color, 
you are ready to decide on 
design and style. You 
will, of course, choose a 
built-in tub, because it is 
an easy fixture to keep clean. There are 
no awkward corners under or around it 
difficult to reach. The modern built-in tub 
is easy to get in and out of. If you select 
one of the newest styles with a seat in a 
corner, one end, or at the side, you will 
have just about the safest tub made. And 
one of the most convenient and beautiful! 
The modern lavatory, with its graceful 
design, i5 the central fixture of any bath- 
room. Plenty of slab space, lustrous sur- 
face, shining fittings, tu- 
bular metal or glass legs, 
or streamlined pedestals, 
are some of its features. 

The modern closet has 
been improved in appear- 
ance and is more quiet in 
action. It may be obtained 
in low, one-piece models, admirably suited 
to the streamlined bathroom. And in 
some models the top of the flush tank 
makes a handy shelf. 

All fixtures, as well as fittings, may now 



- 1 




1 )l 


^■\ 


\My^^ 





be had in matched designs to give an en- 
semble effect to the bathroom. 

Chromium is the most practical and 
loveliest finish for all 
bathroom metal. It is 
easiest to keep bright. 

No bathroom is modern 

without a shower bath, 

either over the tub or in 

a separate compartment. 

Now that manufacturers 

are making prefabricated shower stalls, 

you can have your shower anywhere at 

litde extra cost. 

There are many 
new and glamorous 
materials in all im- 
aginable color combi- 
nations for walls and 
floors: washable wall- 
paper; cork; I i n o - 

leum; marble, as well as vitreous, tiling; 
and all of them sanitary and easy to clean. 
Handsome medicine cabinets and acces- 
sories offer wide choice in styles. Their 
.'fine mirrors should be provided with the 
new shadowless lighting fittings. One of 
the newest accessories is a scale built into 
the wall to save room. i 

Planning your bathrooms will surely be' 
fun. If you consult an experienced plumb- 
ing contractor at every step, and take full 
advantage of modern fixtures and furnish- 
ings, you will gam the satisfaction which 
comes from lovely, yet utilitarian, rooms. 




emdiiJ DOUGLIIS 

Beauty with lifetime durability « « . practical utility with absolute 
satisfaction . . . modernism in goodi taste , . . ifiese qualities 
<Ji9tinguisK tKe Douglas line of better plumbing fixtures . . . avail- 
able in sparkling white or pastel colors from your licensed 
master plumber. » » » For fifty-one years Douglas has made 
plumbing fixtures tbat guarantee satisfactory service, because 
they know plumbing fixtures must serve more than cmy 
otber equipment in the home. '» » » Photograph shows the 
Douglas Mayfair lavatory and Carlton closet in beautiful 
white Douglas Duralite with chrome fittings. Also available 
in colors. Before you build or remodel, write for the new 
FREE color booklet — "beautiful douglas bathrooms." 

JOHn DOUeiflS CO...Cincinnati, 




5U 



SMALL HOME BUILDERS YEAR BOOK — 1938-1939 EDITION 




finemenc that marks it as the 
environment of one who is ac- 
customed to pleasant, construc- 
tive living. The very fact that 
the house is small and that 



T. ..: 1 . I waits all who 
arc aluiui. Co decorate and 
furnish their home. Instinctive 
in each of us is the age-old urge 
to create a beautiful, tastfully fur- 
nished environment that is oio 
very own ... an environment in 
which we can live and entertain 
with pride and enjoyment. 

Building the small house in 
which we plan to live is only the 
lirst step on the great adventure. 
Equally important are the char- 
acter and quality of its furnish- 
ings and decorations. Just what 
qualities must it have to be in 
very truth, "home, the spot of 
earth supremely blest; a dearer, 
sweeter spot than all the rest"? 

Primarily, it must have com- 
fort, beauty and Uvability . . . 
the gracious air of culture and re- 




AI^D EXPRESS 

YOLTR 
PERSONALITY 



v.c mii^ht be sansnea ;a» ^u uu j>i»^o-- 
i;,g boxes, to eat from a rough shelf, 
r>d to store our belongings in some 
iark corner or box. But we know 
today that the furnishings of our 
home actually have a vital bearing on 
our attitude toward life . . . that 
they tell other people what tve are 
. . . and accordingly that we must 
use our best taste and good judgment 
in their selection. 



consequently its furnishings 
must be limited, makes it all 
the more important that they 
be selected wisely and for en- 
during satisfaction. 

If it were necessary to con- 
sider only the physical pur- 
poses served by furniture, and 
not its inherent values, then 




Dres?l Furniture Co, 




From This Delightful Window This Charming Home Maker, and Her Son, 

Bid You Read On and Behold How Handsome Furniture, Tasteful 

Decorations and Lovely, Soft Colors Can Transform an 

Inert Thing of Wood, Brick and Concrete, Pipes, 

Wires and Machines, into a Happy Home. 



( 



d^/ 



Ji K^aaJi ^ciu^c 



t/t/iaxtn^e^^ cin. 



CAN BE YOUOS INEXPENSIVELY 
START ISVITH A DEFINITE PLAN 



THE plan's the thing in any activity 
. . . but especially in furnishing the 
small home. 
You want a smart, comfortably fur- 
nished home that will reflect your own 
good taste, standards of living and cul- 
tural background. Then plan it as skill- 
fully as an artist plans a picture. Your 
house is your canvas. Furniture, acces- 
sories, draperies, floor coveftngs, wall tints 
and fixtures are your paints. Your own 
selectivity and good judgment are your 
brushes. 

Visualize the background against which 
you and your family will feel most at home 
and happiest, for that is the one that will 
be most appropriate and becoming. Then 
create it, bit by bit. 

Color is important. Your own personal 
preferences will dictate the colors you will 
use. In general you will desire the cooler 
shades for the sunny rooms, and sunny 
shades for the darker rooms. You will 
avoid harsh disturbing colors, selecting the 
ones that are complementary to each other, 
even in contrast, in your walls, woodwork, 
floor coverings and draperies. 

Whether you plan to furnish your small 
home all at once or to add a few pieces at 
a time, you will decide in advance the at- 
mosphere you want to create. You may 
prefer the aristocratic air of 18th Century 
English designs, the courdy French styles, 
the fine traditional spirit of Early Ameri- 



can or Colonial, the gaiety of Provincial, 
the sophisticated, clean-cut simplicity of 
Modern or Swedish Modern. Regard- 
less of period, you will avoid fussy, 
faddy designs and choose, instead, fur- 
niture that is authentically styled, well- 
proportioned for the small home, and 
built by expert craftsmen. In woods as 
well as styles, you have a wide range of 
choice. The regal beauty of mahogany 
. . . the warm, rich tones of American 
walnut , . . the sunny charm of maple 
and birch, and other cabinet woods are 
available in today's furniture creations. 

If you plan to buy only part of your 
furniture now, and the balance later, 
make sure that you select the essential 
pieces first and that the additions are com- 
plementary in design. If you now have 
some pieces of 18th Century English fur- 
niture, and want to introduce a fresh mod- 
ern note, then you will find that Swedish 
Modern will combine with it beautifully, 
as will Provincial with Early American. 

Give special attention to the name and 
reputation of the manufacturer and the 
store from which you buy. Don't confuse 
so-called bargains with real values. Na- 
tionally advertised trademarks are usually 
the best guide to lasting quality. 




WELCOME is the keynote of the success- 
fully furnished small home. A fine console 
and mirror with a pair of attractive chairs 
make a hall grouping that is both convenient 
and decorative. 



Lamps, pictures and other decorative ic- 
cessories are the grace notes that will add 
livability and charm to your home. The 
right lamps, the right small decorative ob- 
jects, books, magazines and flowers are in- 
dispensable to the well appointed interior. 

So, too, are wall coverings — paints^ and 
papers, draperies and curtains around win- 
dows, rugs and carpets and the decorative 
floorings like hard wood parquetry, cork 
and rubber tile, and the attractive lino- 
leums. 

All this means ... not necessarily a 
large ouday of money . . . but purposeful 
thinking and planning to create exacdy the 
effect you want to produce. 




Growing in popularity is the social custom of after- 
noon tea. An occasional or tea table offers an ideal 
settmg for this pleasant new vogue. 



An exquisitely styled lamp Is 
one of the most charming of al 
complementary accessories for 
brightening the decorative 
scheme of the small home. You 
can find exactly the right lamps 
to harmonize with your furniture. 



18th Century English pieces combined with Swedish 

Modern prove again the smart effectiveness of 

"something old and something new." 



SMALL HOME BUILDERS YEAR BOOK 1938-1939 EDITION 



53 




THE 





IS FOR JOYOV!^ LIVING 



MAKE your living room what the 
name implies ... a room for 
joyous living! This is where 
your friends and acquaintances see you 
and your family "on parade." It is their 
measuring stick of your good taste in deco- 
rative furnishings ... an accurate reflec- 
tion of your ability as a home-maker. On 
their verdict may depend much of your 
social and business success. 

Let both substantial comfort and gra- 
cious beauty be the keynote of your small 
home living room. Plan your floor cover- 
ings, wall treatment, and window hang- 
ings so that they constitute a restful, deco- 
rative background. Venetian blinds will 
give an effect of spaciousness and smart 
charm, as well as enable ideal light control 



and privacy. 

See that your easy chairs and sofa 
are really comfortable and that 
their quality is the best you can ob- 
tain with the money at your com- 
mand. On their inner construction 
your ultimate satisfaction depends. 
In virtually every American home 
a good radio is essential. Select a 
well-styled design. Create cozy conversa- 
tion groups. Use interesting little tables 
galore. Tables for games, for lamps, cof- 
fee or cocktails, cabinets for books, perhaps 
a what-not for a prized collection of small 
art objects, a well-planned writing desk, 
will provide convenience and beauty. 



Suggestions 
for tlie Ideal 
Living Room 



Comfort, livability and charm are all essen- 
tial to the ideal living room. One delightful 
setting is suggested above with its floor plan. 
Certain pieces of furniture are indispensable. 
.Kx least one sofa (F) and easy chairs (J), of 
course. A radio (H). The right small tables, 
which will include end tables, a coffee or 
cocktail table (G), lamp table (K), occasional 
tables (E), a gateleg (C) or console card table 
for games and snacks. A writing desk or book 
cabinet and desk combination (L). Lamps 
and small decorative accessories. A few good 
prints. Flowers, books, magazines add inter- 
est and individuality. 

In seating pieces you may want to make se- 
lections from the new single unit upholstered 
chairs shown below. These can be combined 
in a variety of ways, as long sofa, tete-a-tete 
grouping, loveseat, or used individually. 



Lamps are indispensable to the well-ap- 
pointed living room. They bring it to life 
and diffuse good cheer. Mirrors offer a 
glamorous touch that creates an effect of 
added space. Your own preferences will 
elect the selection of other decorative acces- 




A writing desk that provides for 
businesslike efficiency as well as 
decoration in the small home is a 
real necessity. This, as you see, 
provides space for a portable 
typewriter and other paraphernalia 
for the writer. 




54 



SMALL HOME BUILDERS YEAR BOOK — 1938-1939 EDITION 



9 ^ 



Lm^pie 




OF INTERIOR DECORATION 



JUST as your architect or contractor 
must know before he plans or builds 
your house how much you are going 
to spend, what kind of a house you want, 
and a hundred other details, so should you 
have definite ideas about how you are go- 
ing to furnish and decorate it before you 
buy even an ash-tray. 

An attractive interior does not just hap- 
pen. It is the result of careful study to get 
maximum comfort and liveableness out of 
available space: careful study of the rooms 
themselves, the effect you :*are trying to 
create and the amount of money you have 
to accomplish it. 

Good taste is born of simplicity, which 
means you need not spend a lot of money 
to get results — it means wise buying. 

Here are some suggestions which will 
help in your study: 

1. Buy on a Budget: Decide how much 
you can spend and be sure that everything 
you want can be had within your budget. 



Experience indicates that a reasonable 
budget for furnishing and decorating a 
new house should be from 20% to 25% 
of the cost of the house itself. If you can- 
not afford such an outlay all at once, make 
a three or a five-year plan and buy the 
essential pieces first, gradually adding to 
them. Don't think that you have to buy 
all new furnishings when you move into 
your new home. The joy and thrill of 
"New" continues so long as you know that 
you can afford to add lovely things year 
after year. There are always touches here 
and there that will make it more attractive. 

2. Buy Quality: Do not sacrifice quality 
in the essential pieces that you expect to 
give years of service. Quality in material 
and craftsmanship never disappoints. And, 
in design, quality means lasting beauty. 

3. Buy Appropriately: Remember that the 
character of the small house is informality, 
friendliness, simplicity, honesty. You do 
not need elaborate pieces. A tawdry imi- 



tation will never deceive anybody. 

4. Furnish to a Flan Based on the Family's 
Needs and Habits: It is not difficult to find 
good pieces that will fit the family and, 
also, harmonize with the general decora- 
tive scheme. Each room should be restful 
but with cheery atmosphere. There must 
be places to read, to study, to entertain. 

5. Wor\ Out a Definite Scheme jar Each 
Room: Determine the personality and ap- 
pearance of each room — ^whether it is- to be 
formal or informal; modern or traditional. 
Work out color schemes for each room that 
will harmonize with the others. 

6. Be Yourself: You can use the prin- 
ciples of good design, color harmony, etc., 
which, after all, are nothing more than evi- 
dences of good taste, to express your in- 
dividuality. Remember it is your home — 
in which you will spend many happy years, 
where you will live, work, entertain; eat 
and sleep, read and grow. Put yourself 
into it as fully as possible. 




^^Help me to choose my Furniture^! 



Early Americaa 
chest and dresser 
base in regal solid 
mahogany. Sleigh 
bed with lovely 
sweeping curves. 

Server inspired by 
a dainty Sheraton 
table — for dining 
or living room. 





SMALL HOME 



BEDROOM, DINING ROOM 
AND OCCASIONAL FURNITURE 



BUILDERS YEAR B O O-K — 1 9 3 8 - 1 9 3 9 EDITION 



DREXEL 

answers your call! 

The days of buying a commonplace suite of 
furniture are over! Pick your furniture piece by 
piece, and you'll have a distinguished room. Send 
for the Drexel booklet and discover how easy this 
can be. You'll see over fifty beautiful mahogany 
reproductions and adaptations of lovely 18th cen- 
tury pieces — simply pick those you like best. All 
Drexel pieces harmonize with each other. You 
can buy a few pieces now, and add more next 
year! Start with fine Drexel furniture, and you 
set a gracious keynote for your home, you have 
a decorative theme around which to build for 
a lifetime! Send coupon for booklet, today! 

I Dept. NSH, DREXEL FURNITURE CO. 
' Drexel, North Carolina. 

I I enclose 10c. Please send me your booklet "So 
I You Want To Furnish With Fine Reproductions !" 

I Name - 

t Street - 

I City State , »- 



55 



A 



awitaiitu 



FOR THE DINIXG ROOM 



So you're going to have a dining rooni! 
That's delightful— and sensible. It's 
so much much decorous to have a 
separate room in which to take your meals, 
and so much more pleasant for your guests 
to be called from the living room to a 
room where the table is set with lovely 
linens and china, shining silver and crystal, 
and surrounded with graceful chairs in 
finely finished woods. 

Today, as since the dawa,of time, one 
of the friendliest and most gracious of all 
social gestures is entertaining at dinner. 
Simple or elaborate, the occasion is always 
one that requires thoughtful planning and 
preparation . . . fastidious attention to 
every detail. The menu is important. So 
is the entertainment scheduled for the eve- 
ning. But particularly important is the at- 
mosphere of your dining room. 

What style shall your dining room be? 
There are three favored by decorators to- 
day and when you come to buy your fur- 
niture you will find wide choice in any of 
the following: 

18th Century English— handsome, im- 
pressive. 

Colonial— charming, hospitable. 
Modern— vivid, gay, exciting. 
There is no reason why the dining room 
of the small home should not be as beau- 
tifully furnished as that of a mansion. In 
recent years, manufacturers have created 
lovely authentically-styled junior dining 
room furniture in a wide variety of designs. 
You may wish to buy just the essential 



pieces as a nucleus for later ad- 
ditions. You will need at least 
a table, chairs, and china closet 
or buf!et. Later, you can add 
a serving table, corner cabinet 
and other convenient pieces. 
Be sure that your dining fur- 
niture is well-built and sturdy. 
Nothing is so annoying as tot- 
tering furniture. See that the 
chairs are comfortable. See, 
too, that the table is of ample 
size and that the cabinet pieces 
are thoughtfully planned, with 
plenty of space for china, glassware, silver 
and linens. 

Introduce color in your floor covering, 
walls, haugings. Dinner services are now 
available in every conceivable type, from 
gay fiesta to egg-shell china, in lovely com- 
binations of color. Linens were never more 
glamorous and varied. They will bring 
individuality, hospitality and good cheer to 
the dining room of your small home. 



Beautifully styled Junior Dining Room ensembles, 
perfectly proportioned for the small home, are 
now available. This is an excellent example of 
18th Century design. From such a group, you 
can select exactly what you need. 




Dear to every woman's heart is a 
tastefully appointed dining room. 
Fine dining furniture, lovely table ac- 
cessories, have launched many a 
hostess on the road to social success. 




Junior Dining Room 
Server 






Junior Dining Room China 
Cabinet 



Junior Dining Room Host 
Chair 




Junior Dining 

Room Dropleaf 

Table 




Junior Dining Room 
Side Chair 



Diexel Furniture Co. 

Select the essential pieces first ... and add harmon- 

iiinq pieces later when the room is enlarged. Mere is 

a beautiful room furnished with 18th Century repro- 

ductions finished in sun tan. 





Junior Dining Room 



56 



Buffet 



SMALL HOME B 



Junior Dining Room Extension 
Table 



UILDERS YEAR B O O K — 1 9 3 8 - I 9 3 9 EDITION 




You can have every piece in your room indi- 
vidually interesting! The original pineapple bed, 
from which the reproduction at the left was 
made, belonged to a Colonel in the Revolu- 
tionary war. The chest is a replica of one found 
in the same home. 



Tastefully furnished in I8fh 
Century style done in ma- 
hogany veneer finished in 
soft sun tan. 



Drexel Furniture Co. 



LET YOUR BtEDROOM REFLECT 




(>ltZ 




etiai^aiUk 



lit 



y 



THINK of the pleasure of others as 
well as your own in planning the 
furnishings for most of your small 
home . . . but of your individual comfort 
(plus your room-mate's, if any) in plan- 
ning the room-of-your-own. 

Let your bedroom reflect your personal- 
ity, your interests, your preferences. Have 
it as large and as pleasant as you can de- 
vise. Select the furniture and accessories 
that are most appropriate and in keeping 
with personal needs. For no other room 
in the home is the range of selection so 
delightful and varied. 

There are styles to suit every taste. Mas- 
culine votes are usually cast for the more 
rugged versions, such as Early English, 
Early American and some of the classically 
simple Swedish Modern creations that are 
now available. French Court styles, espe- 
cially Louis XV with its dainty decorative 
charm, are ideal for the purely feminine 



Graceful and dignified Is this 18th 

Century Chippendale design in 

mahogany veneer accentuated by 

hand padded finish. 




room.' For furnishings schemes that are 
equally pleasing to both men and women, 
there are the gracious aristocratic designs 
of the 18th Century English period, the 
fine traditional Colonial styles of our own 
country, and the distinguished clean-cut 
beauty of good Modern design. Personal 
taste is the best arbiter of the designs you 
will select for the bedrooms in your small 
home, as it is of the colors you will want 
to introduce. 

In addition to the major pieces of furni- 
ture in the sleeping room, a personal desk 
for odd-moment writing and stowing away 
of papers is convenient. An easy chair or 
t\^'0, the right lamps and a chairside table 
may complete the furnishings. Personal 
accessories, fresh crisp curtains and dra- 
peries, restful walls, and a very few pictures 
will add the touches of comfort and cheer 
so indispensable in the room-of -one's own. 



Colonial masterpieces reproduced for 
today's interiors have unfailing charm 
and authentic interest, in small homes 
or large. ^ 




The charm and grace of modified 

Louis XV styles are irresistible, 

and especially appropriate for a 

young girl's room. 



^ - 



These illustrations exemplify 
only a few of the countless 
charming possibilities at 
your command for furnish- 
ing bedrooms in your small 
home. Your furniture dealer 
will be delighted to show 
you these and other smart 
new creations. 

SMALL HOME BUILDERS 




For the modern-minded, 
Swedish Modern originals 
are an ideal choice and 
offer an excellent opportun- 
ity for individual decorative 
effects. 



YEAR BOOK— 1938 



1939 EDITION 



57 



cr:^ 1/ U ell— ^J—lakteJi ^y^^ 



'am.e 

ADDS CHARM TO CDMFORT 




THE lights of home — smooth as silk, soft as velvet! Pleas- 
ingly restful to the eyes. Good lighting helps so much in 
creating that pleasant, healthful, homelike atmosphere 
which blends so perfectly the elements of the small home — 
charm and comfort. Enough light of the right quality im- 
proves the looks of your home, protects your eyes from strain, 
and guards you against accidents. 

There follow brief descriptions of the minimum number and 
kinds of lamps for the different rooms in your home. With 



them are sketches of types of fixtures approved by Illuminating 
Engineering Society (I.E.S.). This organization of lighting ex- 
perts, during the past few years, has made many improvements 
in fixtures to produce maximum diffusion of light by scienti- 
fically designed shades and reflectors which minimize the glare 
that is so hard on the human eye. 

In selecting your fixtures be guided by these minimum stand- 
ards of which there are, of course, many variations to suit any 
kind of decorative scheme. 



\/' j-| HALLS. For entrance hall a Ceiling 
I * (ay Fixture (A) is preferred — with a 60- 
watt bulb. Wall Brackets (G) are 
optional if architectural arrangement 
does not allow for a Ceiling Unit. In 
all other halls either a Ceiling Fixture 

or Wall Bracket is optional. Use 60-\vatt bulbs. 




?^ 



SP7 



such as 25-watt Wall Brackets (G) may be 
added, but do not depend on decorative lighting 
to properly light this room. 

KITCHEN. This, the workshop of 

the home, must have good glareless, 

,^ ^ shadowless lighting. It requires a 

tl " \ Ceiling Fixture — semi-indirect or en- 

*" t closing globe type — such as (A) with a 

150-watt bulb. At work centers such as the range 

and sink there should be Wall Brackets (L) well 

shaded — with 60-w3tt bulbs in each. 



BEDROOMS. Require good general illumination 
from a 150-watt Ceiling Fixture — semi-indirect 
type (B). A pair of Vanity Lamps (I) about 18 
inches in height are a necessity on the dres?ing 
table — 75 watts each. For twin beds an I.E.S.* 




k 



100 to 
—100 



LIVING ROOM. The most used room 
in your home demands good lighting, 
particularly for close visual tasks. It 
requires a 200-watt Ceiling Fixture 
(A); at least 3 I.E.S.* Better Sight 
Lamps: — 1 Floor type (E), of from 
300-watt capacity; 1 End-Table type (F) 
watts; 1 Study type (D) — 100 watts. 



DINING ROOM. Here 
the table, as the most 
important part o£ the 
room, should have a 
semi-indirect type 150- 
watt Ceiling Fixture 
(B) directing good 
downward *light well diffused on the table but 
out of the eyes of the diners. Decorative lights 




BATHROOM. Here, the 
proper lighting of the mir- 

^ ror is most important. A 

K ** Wall Bracket on each side is 

desirable — preferably lumiline lamps or diffusing 
glass cylindrical tj'pe (K) — 60 watts each. If 
the bathroom is large — over 8x8 feet — a 100- 
watt Ceiling Fixture (A) should be added. 

BASEMENT OR RECREA- 
TION: Of greatest importance 
here is a well -lighted stair- 
^ way. The room should have 
a 100-watt Ceiling Fixture (A) if the height per- 
mits and 1 or more Wall Brackets (G) with 
40-watt bulbs. Otherwise, Bracket Units to light 
all parts of the room — 60 watts each. 



100-watt Table Lamp (F) or Wall Lamps (H) 
over each bed — 75 watts each. For double beds, 
at least one — preferably two, I.E.S.* 100-watt 
Reading Lamps (D). 

ENTRANCE. At front en- 
trance at least one light should 
be installed at side of doorway 
or over the door. The Lan- 
tern type (N) is most pop- 
ular — 60 watts. Rear or side 
entrances should have a light 
installed in the same manner as the front en- 
trance — 60 watts. On all garages, whether at- 
tached or detached, there should be one light 
(M) over the door (75 watts) or two (N) on 
the sides (40 watts each). One Ceiling Unit (A) 
or two Wall Brackets (G) are necessary in the 
garage (with 75 -watt bulbs). i 

*Uluminating Engineering Society 




USE THIS CHART FOR YOUR CHECK LIST 



IDENTIFICATION 
MARK AND TYPE 
OF FIXTURE 




P5 E 






z 

1 


^5 


H 
Z 


2 
O 
O 

i 


% 

8 

s 




1/3 







^ 
^ 


A 


CEILING FIXTURE 
(Lights— shaded) 




























B 


CEILING FIXTURE 
(Semi-Indirect) 




























C 


CEILING FIXTURE 
(Hanging) 




























D 


STUDY LAMP 




























E 


FLOOR LAMP 




























F 


TABLE LAMP 




























G 


WALL BRACKET 




























H 


PORTABLE WALL LAMP 




























I 


VANITY LAMPS 




























K 


BATH MIRROR LAMPS 




























L 


RANGE LIGHT 




























M 


FRONT ENTRANCE- 
EXTERIOR 




























N 


REAR ENTRANCE- 
EXTERIOR 





























58 



SMALL HOME BUILDERS YEAR BOOK 1938-1939 EDITION 



( 



X 



PLANNING YOUR 
DECORATIVE SCHEME 

Composing your decorative scheme is a 
good deal like composing music. You 
have to compose each room in a certain 
key. Any key you like, but once chosen 
it's smart to keep your overtones and un- 
dertones in harmony with the dominant 
chord sounded by the furniture. That 
means not only curtains and draperies, but 
also upholstery fabrics, slip covers, pillows 
and cushions. Lamps, too, and vases and 
ornaments should bring definite tone-col- 
ors. Ash trays, desk sets, toilet articles on 
the dressing table, and all the knick-knacks 
we pick up here and there, even book- 
jackets — a bright paper cover may look 
very dashing — should be chosen with an 
eye to their part in the decorative scheme. 

1. MaJ{€ a Plan of E(i<?h Room and locate 
on it each piece of furniture to assure max- 
imum use of windows and wall spaces. 
Place principal pieces around focal points, 
such as the fireplace, or a large window. 
Provide traffic lanes, and balance small and 
large pieces. (See page 54.) Group pic- 
tures to fit the furniture. Plan carefully for 
day as well as night lighting (See page 58). 
Large, well-placed mirrors will make a 
small room look twice its size and bring 
in a glowing touch of outdoors. 

2. The Basic Decorative Theme is, of 
course, determined by the dominant period 
style of furnishing, such as S\\edish Mod- 
ern, Early American, 18th Century, etc. 
In the small home, the best results will be 
obtained if this theme be followed out as 
closely as possible in every room. 

3. Start with the Floor. The size of the 
floor coverings and their color and texture 
must fit the general theme. In the small 
room, avoid the confusion of large pat- 
terns and brilliant colors. Solid colors in 
simple designs are best. 

4. Next Come the Walls and Windoivs. 
Here light colors should be used with not 
too large patterns in the wallpaper. Small 
spots of bright color help the general ef- 
fect but large patterns and heavy colors de- 
crease the size of a room. 

The walls offer the largest expanse of 
color and carry the background tone of the 
whole color scheme. Today's wallpapers 
offer a wide range of designs, from grace- 
ful floral patterns in gay colors, to prim, 
lacy patterns in delicate tints and neutral 
backgrounds. Good wallpaper can work 
wonders to beautify your home, and is tra- 
ditional for rooms done in Early American. 

And for painted walls consult your con- 
tracting painter, who has sound knowledge 
of color combinations and how to ef- 
fect them. (For Interior Paints see page 




.^WALLPAPER SENSATION! 

Lr DULL C^FINISH 




Tiny fingerprints, ra- 
diator smudge, soot, 
grease — practically 
any kind of stain — 
can be washed off 
DuRAY Wallpaper as easily as washing 
tile ! That's why mothers— and everybody 
— are hailing this sensatioiial new paint- 
coated wallpaper that keeps new-looking 
for years with soap and water! 

No other wallpaper is made like 
DuRAY. First it is painted with the 
equivalent. of two coats of baked-on dull- 
coat enamel. Over this surface, the pat- 
tern is printed in washable lacquer-type 
inks. It is actually paint-in-rolls . . . com- 



bining the stain-resistance and waihabil- 
ity of paint with the smart patterns and 
rich dull velvety finish of finest wall- 
paper. That's why DURAY is more than 
washable — it's SCRUBBABLE! You can 
actually scrub it with a brush, and soap 
and water, without "fuzzing," 

You'll love DtJRAY's appearance, 
and you'll appreciate Duray's econ- 
omy, because it keeps new and fresh- 
looking for years. See the new 1938 
DuRAY line . . . styled by leading Amer- 
ican designers, and moderately priced . . . 
at decorators, wallpaper dealers and 
leading department stores. 




A glimpse of two of the 150 smart 
patterns available in DURAY. 

DURAY 

SCRUBBABLE AS TILE 



At wear-points, dirt, 
Bmudge, grease can't 
Btaiil it — wash off 
Duray's dull finish 
paint-coated surface 
with soap and water. 



Fingerprints, pencil 
marks, etc. wash off in 
a jiffy. Leave no traces 
— no streaks, no fuzz, 
no watermarks. 



Send for FREE SAMPLES 

Write CLOPAY CORP., 13SO Exeter St., 
Cincinnati, Ohio, and "ire Will send you 
free sampU's ol the new 1938 Duray pat- 
terns, .and give you name of nearest dealer. 
Just clip off this corner, write your name 
and addressoD margin, paste on postcard. 



SM.\LL HOME BUILDERS YEARBOOK— 1938-1939 EDITION 




^ 



One of These Windo^v Shades 
Costs 15e..the Other ^1.50 

WHICH IS WHICH? 




AhovB guaranteed to be exact photographic reproductions of shades named* 



In Actual Tests 3 Women Out of 4 Thought the 
Looked the More Expensive 



See These Amazing Shades at 

Neighborhood and 5c &. 10c 

Stores Everywhere 

A REMARKABLE new cellulose material^ is 
found to be far more practical for win- 
dow shades. Hangs straight, rolls evenly, 
doesn't crack, curl or pinhole. Wears 
amazingly. More than that, an exclusive 
Clop AY process produces a lovely Linione 
texture that so resembles fine-count linen 
as to astonish women everywhere. In actual 
tests, 3 out of 4 women viewing a 15c 
CLOPAvZ/intone beside a $1.50 shade only 
4 feet away, thought the Clopay was the 
more expensive shade I (Affidavit on file.) 

ONLY CLOPAYS ARE LINTONED 

Clopay Liniones come in a wide variety 
of colors to fit any decorative scheme. Cost 
only 15c, ready to attach in a jiffy to old 
rollers with patented Clopay gummed strip. 
No skill, no tacks, no tools needed. On new 
rollers, including molded shade button and 
new EDGE SAVER brackets, 25c. Clopays 
are sold at 5c & 10c and neighborhood stores 
everywhere. But be sure to ask for AND 
GET genuine Clopay Lm^ones— America's 
fastest selling window shades — the only fibre 

♦Did you guess correctly? The shade at lower left 
ia the Clopay Lintone. Try it on your frienda. 



window shade with the rich, exclusive finish 
that looks like linen. 

CLOPAY WadUaJde Shaded. 

WITH THE RICH LINTONE TEXTURE 

For only 10c more per shade you can now 
get window shades made of the costly-look- 
ing Clopay Lintone material PLUS a 
coating on both sides of expensive oil-paint 
finish that's 100^ washable! All you need is 
plain soap and water. Grime, grit, soot, stain, 
and finger marks wash off like magic with 
never a streak, ring or watermark. Clopay 
Washables come in a variety of colors, 
all with the exclusive Lintone texture that 
resembles fine-count 
linen. Clopay Wash- 
ables on new rollers 
including new EDGE 
SAVER brackets and 
molded shade button, 
cost only 35c for 36"x6' 
size. At 5c and 10c and 
neighborhood stores 
everywhere. For sample J 
swatches of both type 
Clopays, send 3 c stamp 
to Clopay Corporation, 
1357 Exeter Street, Cincin- 
nati, Ohio. 




61.) The height of walls can be reduced 
by horizontal lines, or borders, at top or 
bottom. The simplest way to do this is 
by darker shades below a chair rail or 
above a picture mold. Wainscoting of 
wood panelling, painted or stained, or of 
cork tile tinted to match the color scheme 
will give a highly decorative effect. 



CLOPAY LINTONE WINDOW SHADES 




Highly decorative vanity lamps, mirror and; 
vanity case are in balance with the simple dress- 
ing table, large-patterned rug and plain wall- 
paper. 

Your house today poses a real prob- 
lem in window treatment. The trim 
around openings must match the general 
color scheme and textures and patterns 
must fit the furniture and rugs. To bring 
this about you have wide choice of colors, 
fabrics, patterns, etc., for any style of room, 
as, for 18th Century, formal fabrics like 
damasks and tafifetas; for informality, 
printed fabrics with floral patterns on dark 
backgrounds. Generally the draperies are 
of darker shades than the walls. 

All windows look better with soft tan 
shades for a neutral background. And they 
let in daylight without glare. Venetian 
blinds go well with almost any furniture. 

Glass curtains are made from different 
materials. Rayons give a luxurious ap- 
pearance and are washable. For the gay, 
informal window inexpensive cottons will 
do nicely. 

Every window offers another opportu- 
nity to improve your composition, and you 
don't have to stretch your budget to do it. 
You can start with shades and glass cur- 
tains, and add later draperies, valances and 
similar accessories to harmonize with and 
enhance your color symphony. 
5. Have a Definite Color Scheme. Use 
color boldly for accent: Yellows and reds 
for warmth, blue and greens for coolness. 



I 



60 



SMALL HOME BUILDERS YEAR BOOK 1938-1939 EDITION 



I 



1 



Here are some suggestions for color: 

For the informal modern living room — 
Multicolored cool-textured rugs; warm tan 
walls; soft green and wood tones for pat- 
tern, and rough-woven fabrics in draperies. 

For a bedroom in floral colors; a rug in 
pastel shades to harmonize with rosy peach 
walls. A cool blue bedspread, which gives 
light and cheer. 

And for a formal but gracious living 
room— rich wine-tone wool-pile rug with 
soft blue walls and draperies of striped 
and flower-patterned fabrics. 

Pictures, lamps, and ornaments can also 
provide sparkling and vivid spots of color 
against neutral backgrounds. 
6. Have Plenty of Light. Before you can 
have any color at all, remember you must 
have what creates color — light! Good light 
is a vital part of home decoration. It not 
only brings life to ypur color arrangement, 
but it also protects your most precious pos- 
session, your eyes. So have plenty of light, 
with properly shaded lamps to give correct 
illumination without glare. See that your 
lamps not only give good light, but also 
harmonize with your room tones. 




Good, If severe, pertod furniture and neufral 

flat walls enlivened by a Chippendale mirror 

and gay draperies. The graceful vases add 

needed spols of color. 

By reflecting light mirrors echo every 
note of color harmonies. Big ones . . . 
little ones . , . spread-eagled aristocrats 
in golden frames for your early American 
room . . . small mirrors for the dressing 
table . . . tall framed will mirrors that 
double the size of narrow rooms . . . are 
essential parts of today's decorative scheme. 
7. Stic\ to the If? formal. Never forget that 
color, scale, design, and texture must be 
harmonious. When in doubt, choose the 
simpler thing — it goes with the small house 
and is always good taste anywhere. 



INTERIOR PAINTS 

(See also Exterior Painting — Page 30) 

INTERIOR paints are divided into 
three kinds of products: (1) ordinary 
wall paints classed as flat, semi-gloss 
and gloss;. (2) enamels for use on trim and 
for bathroom and kitchen walls where a 
hard durable surface is wanted, and (3) 
water-thinned paints which range in qual- 
ity all the way from wall and ceiling paint 
of exceptional color interest and light re- 
flecting values down to the cheapest cal- 
cimines and white wash. In addition there 
are special finishes for wood work, such as 
stains, varnishes, shellacs, waxes, oils, etc. 

Most interior oil paints are mixed paints 
and the labels on the better quality prod- 
ucts will usually show a fairly high per- 
centage of lithapone or titanium and a 
relatively low percentage of calcium 
(chalk), gypsum and similar inert ingre- 
dients. There are the paints used on plas- 
ter and woodwork indoors. 

The enamels, having a harder, more en- 
during surface, contain rather expensive 
oils and very finely ground pigments. 
The lacquers, which are also used like 
enamels, use a totally different kind of 
liquid that dries rapidly and makes a hard 
washable surface; because of their quick 
drying properties they are often difficult 
to apply with a brush. 

Among the water-thinned paints are 
many high quality products suitable for 
decorating walls and ceilings that are not 
subject to abrasion and wear. These wash- 
able water-thinned paints have more bril- 
liant color and somewhat higher light re- 
flecting values than oil paints; they are 
easier to use and are often preferred for 
their decorative values. They can be easily 
redecorated and do not. require removal 
from the wall before each new coating. 
The lower quality water-thinned paints, 
such as the calcimines, are also made in 
washable types but they do not have as 
much durability and are generally em- 
ployed for ceilings where a flat finish is de- 
sired and for very low cost work. 

Stains come in various colors, closely re- 
sembling natural finishes, or heavy enough 
to disguise the original wood. Varnishes 
and shellacs, both with and without pig- 
ments, are used wherever a highly reflec- 
tive surface is wanted, as on a floor. Waxes 
and oils are usually applied over stains or 
natural wood to produce soft, dull surfaces. 

Important to interior painting are dry, 
clean and smooth surfaces, for walls and 
floors, with their large, plane areas, reflect 
every dirt spot and unevenness. Good 
paint is washable, of course, and in places 
likely to soil quickly a semi-gloss or gloss 
paint is best because it will clean readily. 



THIS PMHT 



--S^^iS?^ 





Cprc InUrior Decorator' a chart 
• nt^^ akowing wall colors tokich 
"po" with favored color combina- 
tional}/ drapes, ruga, upkolsteriet. 

For beautiful walls 
and ceilmgs, paint 
with LUMINALL. 



This paint does more 
for your rooms and 
furnishings because its pigments are un- 
obscured by oil-film. All tints and colors 
are clear and true. 

Very Economical 
Aside from its greater beauty, there are 
other advantages to LUMINAJt'L paint. 
It covers in one coat; hence, marked 
economy in labor and paint costs. Dec- 
orating takes less time and is less disturb^ ,^ 
ing because LUMINALL is practically 
odorless and dries in 40 minutes. It has 
remarkable qualities for making both 
artificial and natural light more effeci- ;■■•'=■. 

Use LUMINALL Wherever 
Flat Paint Is Desired 

Use it wherever a flat paint is desired. 
Recommended by architects, decorators, , 
painters and home-owners everywhere. 

Now, with our greatly enlarged manu- 
facturing facilities, you too can have gen- 
uine LUMINALL. Sold only by author- 
ized dcalers^ — ^ask for name of the one 
nearest you. 

Now! a New and Better , 

Exterior Masonry Paint 

Painting masonry? For beautifying and 
protecting concrete, stucco, or brick, use 
"OUTSIDE" LUMINALL. It's the sensation 
in exterior masonry paints. It's the only one- , 
coat paint that may be applied on either new 
or painted surfaces. Much easier to apply. 
X^^'hitest of whites, and beautiful colors. De- 
scriptive literature on request. 

LUMINALL 



NATIONAL CHEMICAL &i. MFG. CO., 
3619 South Ma:y St., Chicago. 

I'leasB send D Interior Deoorator's Cliart showing 
liow to select wall colore to harmonize with pres- 
ent color seliemes of home furnishings. D Literature 
on "OUTSIDE" LUinNALL for masonry exteriors, 
n Name of nearest Luniinall dealer. 

Name 

Address 



SMALL HOME BUILDERS YEAR BOOK — 1938-1939 EDITION 



61 



^1/ La act 



itiTe 



f 




TO KKEP THE OLD HOISF. YOUNG 



DOES your home need re- 
pairs? Do you want to 
make alterations? Or im- 
provements? Now they can be 
niade through a Modernization 
Loan, on the most favorable terms 
possible, from private lending institutions 
under the Property Improvement Plan of 
the Federal Housing Administration, made 
possible by the recently amended National 
Housing Act. Under it the Government 
can insure improvements, or additions to 
existing structures, up to $10,000, and re- 
payments, suited to your income, can be 
made on a monthly, semi-monthly, or 
weekly basis and spread over a period of 
five years. The charges, including interest, 
will not be more than the equivalent of $5 
discount per $100 original face value of the 
note, payable in equal monthly install- 
ments. For example, if you want to bor- 
row $500— 

FOR YOU SIGN A AN'D PAV 

NOTE FOR MONTHLY 




1 Year $526.32. 

2 Years 550.61 . 

3 Years 574.90. 

4 Years 599.19, 

5 Years 623.48. 



$43.86 
. 22.95 
. 15.97 
. 12.49 
. 10.40 



WHAT FUA CAIV DO 
TO TITRI¥ OLD UNTO !%EH 

The requirements for such loans are 
simple. You must either own your prop- 
erty or have a lease on it running at least 
six months longer than the term of the 
loan you are seeking. 

Every house needs repairs and upkeep 
regularly. If they are neglected, future 
costs mount rapidly, as deterioration pro- 
ceeds, and any house quickly loses value 
both as a dwelling place and, more im- 
portant, as an investment. Look carefully 
at your property today. What is the con- 
tlition of your investment? Is it in good 
shape or shabby and run down? 

On the next page is a list of questions 
that will help you check the condition of 
your home today. When you have an- 
swered each "Yes" or "No" you can plan 
your modernization program intelligently. 



The only items not eligible are 
those that are removable and not a 
part of the house or property, such 
as furniture and equipment like 
rugs, draperies, furniture, stoves, 
refrigerators. Architectural services 
may be included as a legitimate expense, 
for even small expenditures are more wisely 
made when they are done on the advice 
of experts. 

FHA will also insure loans for New 
Structures, such as — a garage, a guest 
house, a green house, service buildings. 
Such loans may be made for $2500 or less 
with repayments spread over a period of 
7 years. Charges are less than for loans 
on alterations and additions. 

To get a loan for improving your prop- 
erty all you have to do is get a written 
estimate from a reputable contractor or 
builder and go to a local bank, building 
and loan association, or financing institu- 
tion approved by the Federal Housing Ad- 
ministration. There you make out an ap- 
plication, and, when it is approved, sign a 
note with repayment terms calculated to 
suit your budget. The money is imme- 
diately available; the bank will make pay- 
ments as the work progresses. 



y" 



:^^ 



SMALL HOME BllLDERS YEAR BOOK 1938-1939 EDITION 



rSE THESE EISTS TO CHECK THE CONHITIOIN OF YOUR PROPERTY 



THE BASEMENT 

1. Are foundation walls in good condi- 
tion and water-tight? 2. Is there 

enough natural light? 3. Ventila- 
tion? 4. Is the floor paved? 

5. In good condition? 6. Is the heat- 
ing plant satisfactory? 7. Easy to op- 

^i-ate? . 8. Is the water-heating sys- 
tem satisfactory?..... 9. Does it give 
plenty of hot water? 10. Is the laun- 
dry up-to-date? H- Are the tubs 

satisfactory? 12. Is the structural tim- 
ber in good condition? 13. Free from 

termites? H. Have you a recreation 

room? 15. Is the wiring and light- 
ing adequate and safe? 

An unsightly cellar transformed to an attractive 
Recreation ■*Room. 




FIRST AND SECOND FLOORS 

1. Are floors in good condition? 

2. Are walls and ceilings decorated attrac- 
tively? 3. Do doors and windows 

work easily? 4. Are they weather- 
tight? 5. Double-glazed? 6. 

Have you a fireplace? . . 7. Does it 

draw properly? 8. Is the fireplace 

mantel attractive? 9. Are chimneys 

fire-safe? 10. Have you enough built- 
in features — book-cases, etc.? 11. Is 

the kitchen well-planned? 12. 

Enough storage and working space ? 

13. Is sink modern, easy to keep clean? 

14. Is there good ventilation? 

15. Is floor easy on the feet? 16. 

Have you a dining alcove or breakfast 

nook? 17. Is it satisfactory? 

18. Is trim and woodwork in good shape? 
19. Are stairs convenient, safe, well- 
lighted? 20. Have you enough elec- 
tric outlets and up-to-date fixtures? 

21. Are they properly located? 22. 

Have you enough room? 23. Are 

bathroom facilities satisfactory and mod- 
ern? 24. Is the plumbing system in 

good condition? 25. Have you a fin- 
ished attic? 26. Is it well-lighted and 

ventilated? 27. Are floors and in- 
terior walls insulated against noise? ..... 
28. Have you enough radiators? 



THE EXTERIOR 

1. Are exterior walls in good repair and 

weather-tight? 2. Are walls and roof 

insulated against heat and cold ? 3. 

Has exterior woodwork been painted in 
the last 3 years? ..... 4. Is sheet-metal 

work in sound condition? 5. Is your 

roof weather-tight? 6. Are chimneys 

in good condition, no loose bricks or 

stones ? 7. Are shutters in good 

shape? 8. Are fences and walls in 

good order? 9. Have you enough 

trees, shrubs and flowers? 10. Is your 

lawn free frorh weeds? 11. Are 

walks and driveway in repair? 12. 

Does your land drain properly? 13. 

Have you enough exterior lighting? 




AFTER 



ELIGIBLE IMPROVEMENTS, ALTERATIONS ANB REPAIRS 



Following are some of the additions or 
improvements that you can make through 
a Modernization Loan. 

1. A NEW HEATING SYSTEM — 
automatically controlled heat for comfort, 
convenience and economical operation. 

2. NEW PIPING — to provide a full 
flow of hot and cold water at all times. 

3. A WATER-SOFTENER— to make 
hard water easier to use. 

4. A RECREATION ROOM — for 
cards, ping-pong, etc.; a place for the chil- 
dren on rainy days. 

5. LAUNDRY TUBS that are sanitary 
and easy to work at. 

6. A LAUNDRY CHUTE will save 
many steps. 

7. AN INCINERATOR is a sanitary 
and convenient time-saver. 

8. NEW ELECTRIC WIRING AND 
FIXTURES— Scientifically-designed light- 
ing gives the right light in the right place 
and eliminates glare. 

9. NEW DOORS AND WINDOWS- 



for better light, and, double-glazed, to bet- 
ter shut out cold. 

10. A BAY WINDOW added to dining 
or living room brings light, beauty and 
spaciousness. 

11. NEW FLOORS are easy on the teet 
and easy to keep clean. 

12. A NEW FIREPLACE brings ad- 
ditional comfort and beauty. 

13. ADDITIONAL MIRRORS, espe- 
cially over the mantel, add spaciousness, 
light and beauty. 

14. A LIVING PORCH, glassed and 
screened will bring to your house more 
elbow-room. 

15. EXTRA ROOMS — a library, an- 
other bedroom and bath, or a powder room 
on the first floor. 

16. A REPLANNED KITCHEN-^ffi- 
cient storage, cleaning and cooking centers 
save steps and drudgery. 

17. A FINISHED ATTIC with extra 
bedrooms or a recreation room makes a 
big house out of a little one. 

18. AN ATTIC STAIR of the disap 



SMALL HOME BUILDERS YEAR BOOK— 1 9 3 8 - 1 9 3 9 EDITION 



pearing kind makes it possible to use the 2 
attic space for storage or extra rooms. f 

19. A NEW ROOF to replace one that 
has served its time. 

20. A REAL PAINT JOB, inside and 
out, protects, preserves and beautifies. 

21. GARDEN WALLS and FENCES 
are attractive and protect your property. 

22. A GARDEN FOUNTAIN is pleas- 
antly cooling, and the birds love it. 

23. A WADING POOL for the chil- 
dren doesn't take much room. 

24. A ROCK GARDEN is a feature of 
good landscape gardening. 

25. NEW TERRACES, WALKS, 
DRIVES add beauty and utility to your 
grounds. 

26. A NEW LAWN and MORE 
TREES, SHRUBS and FLOWERS will 
give your house a lovely setting. 

27. A WELL and pumping equipment 
for healthful water supply. 

28. ANOTHER CISTERN for the 

home tha t needs to store plenty of water . 

The "Before" and "After" pictures on Ms and 
page 62 are from Johns-Manville Home Idea book. 

65 



$500.00 M Mi 



1 



FOR LETTERS ARODT YOUR NEW HOME! 

I 

Your NEW HOME— either started or finished in 1938 or to be built in 1939— can help you earn one of these 
generous cash prizes. All you need do is to write a letter about some advertised product you selected, telling 
why you chose it for your home. 

Subject to the simple Contest Rules printed below NATIONAL SMALL HOMES BUREAU, Inc. will 
award the following 28 CASH PRIZES for letters about Building Materials, Equipment, Furnishings and Deco- 



rations. CLASS I— HOMES STARTED OR FINISHED 
IN 1938 

A — Letters about any product ADVERTISED 
IN THIS BOOK: 

Seven Prizes Totaling $100 

FIRST PRIZE $50.00 

SECOND PRIZE 25.00 

5 PRIZES^ Each 5.00 

B— Letters about any NATIONALLY ADVER- 
TISED product for the home. 
Seven Prizes Totaling |100 

FIRST PRIZE $50.00 

SECOND PRIZE 25.00 

5 PRIZES Each 5.00 



CLASS II— HOME TO BE STARTED OR FIN- 
ISHED IN 1939 

A — Letters about any product ADVERTISED 
IN THIS BOOK: 

Seven Prizes Totaling $200 

FIRST PRIZE $100.00 

SECOND PRIZE 50.00 

5 PRIZES Each 10.00 

B— Letters about any NATIONALLY ADVER- 
TISED product for the home. 
Seven Prizes Totaling $100 

FIRST PRIZE $50.00 

SECOND PRIZE 25.00 

5 PRIZES Each 5.00 



CONTEST RULES— Read Carefully 

1. This contest is open to any bona fide owner of 
a home completed or started in 1938 for prizes 
offered in Class I; and to any person planning to 
build in 1939 for prizes offered in Class II. 

2. Just write and send in a letter not more than 
250 words long about some product you used, or 
plan to use, and your reasons for selecting it. 
Letters must be legibly written or typewritten, on 
one side of the paper only. 

3. Alt letters mtist name the product and the 
mamrfacturer and give the address of the house, 
or the location where it is to be built, and the 



names and addresses of architect, builder, or both, 
if they have been selected. 

4. Each letter must be confined to a single prod- 
uct, or closely related products, of one manufac- 
turer. 

5. Contestants may submit as many separate let- 
ters as they wish about products of different manu- 
facturers. Any contestant is eligible to win more 
than one prize. 

6. Pictures and plans may be included but are not 
essential. None can be returned. 

7. The decisions of the judges are final. 



8. All letters or other material entered in this 
contest become the property of NATIONAL 
SMALL HOMES BUREAU, Inc., and may be pub- 
lished or otherwise used at its discretion. 

9. No letters or other entries will be returned. 

10. CONTEST CLOSES AT MIDNIGHT, 
MARCH 31, 1939. 

Address entries to: Contest Judges 

National Small Homes Bureau, Inc. 
572 Madison Avenue, New York, N. Y. 

START NOW! ENTER THIS CONTEST. EN- 
TRIES MAY BE SENT IN AT ANY TIME UP 
TO THE CLOSING DATE. 



CUT COUPON HERE 



BUILDING MATERIALS 

O 1 Copper, Brass and Bronze Through- 
out Your Home 

The American Brass Co. 
n 2 Neiv Money Saving Ideas for Houie 
Builders 

The Celotex Corp. 
D 3 Chaniberlin Weather Strips and 
Screens 

Chaniberlin Metal Weather Strip 

Co. 
n 4 Chief House Paint 
n 5 Du-Kwilt 4-Hour £naniel 
D 6 Interior Glo.s.s Finisli 

Chicago Paint Worlcs 
n 7 Corinco Corl< Flooring 

Cork Insulation Corp. 
D 8 Year Round Insulation 

Kimberly-Clarlv Corp. 



n Window Conditioning 

Liibbey-Owens-Ford Glass Co. 
n 10 Checlv Y'^our liViring 

National Adequate Wiring Bureau 
D 11 LtJMIIVALil. Color Card — No, 1 
n 12 Interior Decorators Chart-^No. 4 
n 13 OUTSIDE LiUMINALL. Color Card — 

No. 42 
n 14 OUTSIDE LUMINA1.L. — No. 62 

National Chemical & Mfg. Co. 
n 15 For Home Iiovers 
Q 16 New Interior Idea«t in W^ood 
G 17 Soft W^arni Beauty of Panelling 
D IS Why ^Vood W^alls Are Best 

National Lumber Manufacturers 

Ass'n. 
n 19 Why People Like Concrete Houses 

Portland Cement Ass'n. 
D 20 Y'^our Home of Burned Clay Masonry 

Structural Clay Products 

Institute 



National Small Homes Bureau, Inc. 
572 Madison Ave.. New York. N. Y. 

Please arrange to get me the booklets checked above. 



I expect to build abouK 



Street 



(Write Date Here) 



CHECK 
HERE 



City . State. 



if y o u would 
like future 
issues of 
SMALL 
HOME 
BUILDERS 
YEAR BOOK. 



HOME EQUIPMENT 

□ 21 Planning the World's Easiest-to-Keep 

House 

American Gas Asa'n. 
n 22 Light for Seeing 

Better Light, Better Sight Bureau 
n 23 Breez-Air Attic Cooling Fans — No. 

30S5-H 
D 24 Bulfalo Kitchen Ventilating Fans- 
No. 2S82-H 

Buffalo Forge Co. 
n 25 Home Heating Helps 

Burn ham Boiler Corp. 
n 26 Beautiful Douglas Bath Rooms 

The John Douglas Co. 

□ 27 Designed for Living^ — Electric Klteh- 

ens by Hotpoint 

D 28 Hotpoint Electric Kitchens 

(Special feature attractions for 
Demonstration Homes) 
Edison General Electric Appli- 
ance Co., Inc. 

D 20 Comfort & Cleanliness In Your Home 
— Form No. 1.13 

Holland Furnace Co. 

n 30 Let's Talk About Electric Kitchens 
The Modern Kitchen Bureau 

D 31 The Key to Secrets of Better Heating 
National Coal Ass'n. 

HOME FURNISHINGS 

n 33 Presenting Duray, the Paint-Coated 
Serubbable Wallpaper 

n 33 Color Sample^! of Famous Clopay Fi- 
bre Windo^v Shades 

Clopay Corporation 
Q 34 So Y'ou AVant to Furnish with Fine 
Keproduotions 

Drexel Furniture Co. 

HOME INSURANCE & FINANCE 

n 35 Electric Service with Safety 
G 36 If Y'our Home Burns Tonight 
D 37 Stop Fire 

Federal ^Mutual Fire Insurance 
Co. 



64 



SMALL HOME BUILDERS YEAR BOOK 1938-1939 EDITION 



GROSSMAN Puts iiQfyiQ Owfiership 

WITHIN YOUR REACHI 




The WESTBROOK, One of Our ^ 

Many Distinctive Home Plans'. <— | 




Easy Financing Terms 
Through Grossman^s 

*• Rent -Like Plan 

SEE HOW EASY IT IS - - - Your 
Rent Money Will Pay For The 
HOME You've Always Wanted 

ONLY Grossman can offer such a complete and aim- 
ule service. Manv varied and distinctive plans 
for your selection. We handle all the details, in- 
cluding the financing- . . . arranged just like rent. 
Your lot of land may be of sufficient value to take 
r-ire of the down payment. All you need is a small 
amount each inont?r Lnd THE HOME IS YOUR OWN 
a Substantial Investment, Far Better To Have 
Than a Flock of Rent Receipts. w^it» 

Start today on the road to home ownership. Wr'te 
phone, or visit the nearest Grossman Yard to talk It 
over with us. Take advantage of our many years of 
practical experience. Check the nationally 5uiown 
materials specified for the comfort, permanence and 
beauty of "The Home of Your Dreams." This Is the 
first greatest and perhaps only opportunity that your 
lifetime Will offer to get the Home You've Alway^ 
Wanted with the money you are now paying for 
rent. 

ACT NOW! 



, Attractive Plans For Your Selection 
or Our Architect Will Make a Prehmi- 
Sketch of Your Idetyg! 




Enjoy the Great Outdoors 

BUILD A CAMP 

By the side of a lake in the mountains or at the 
seashore. Make a worthwhile investment in the 
happiness of your whole family. 

YOU CAN GET ALL MATERIALS. FOR 

NO MONEY DOWN 

SMALL MONTHLY PAYMENTS 
UP TO 3 YEARS TO PAY 

come in and see us. We will be pleased to help 
you with your plans and arrange the oataHs. 




'Everything To Build With" 




NEW 



BUILD on the Grossman Pran . . . mor6 sensible than paying rent 

GROSSMAN'S 

MAIN YARD-no GRANITE STREET, (?UINCY-PREsidert 7100 
NEW BEDFORD ... 27 Ashley Blvd. . . . New Bedford 350 

ENGLAND'S LARGEST BUILDING MATERIAL DEALERS 



Modern Improvements at 
Mod-erate Costs 




^4«r 



■^;«^-si«^«j-fc-** ^ 




GROSSMAN WILL HELP VOU 

REPAIR and REMODEL 

with the most liberal Terms on our 

EASY BUDGET PLAN 

• NO MONEY DOWN * NO ENDORSERS 

• SMALL MONTHLY PAYMENTS 

• AS LONG AS 3 YEARS TO PAY • NO RED TAPE 

For just a few dollars you can transform the interior of your home 
with new oak floors or brighten up with a new paint covering; bring* 
efficiency and beauty into your kitchen with a new sink and cabinet 
combination at real moderate cost; bring cheerfulness into your 
bathroom with a modern outfit. The following lists are but a few 
of the many improvements ' that can be made through Grossman's 
easy payment plan. 



REMODEL YOUR KITCHEN 
$C98 



5 



a month 



Modernize your kitchen into a room 
containing charm and eflficiency. A 
modern, compact, step-saving 
kitchen. 



A NEW BATHROOM 
$1^74 

^ a month 

NeW heating PLANT 



6 




a month 



Put on a new roof with Grossman's 
superior shingles and enjoy lasting 
satisfaction in real beauty and sav- 
ings. 




A SPARE ROOM 

as little as 20C a day 



An extra room in the attic or 
basement . . . for entertainment 
for the children. You can enjoy 
such a room for as littie as 20c 
a day. 



INSULATION 

Increases home comfort and reduces fuel costs 
at least '20%. It gives relief from excessive 
summer heat and keeps warm air in your home 
during the winter. On most houses insulation 
has paid for itself in 3 years. Come in and see 
us for a free estimate. 

HURRY TO GROSSMAN'S RIGHT AWAY 

GROSSMAN'S 

MAIN YARD— 130 GRANITE STREET, QUINCY— PRESIDENT 7100 

FITCHBURG— Westminster St.. Fitchbura 31 II NEWTON— 27 Washington St. . .Wellesley 0200 

MALDEN— 240 Eastern Avenue... Maiden 0774 B I LLE RICA— Boston Road Billerica 443 

TAUNTON— Oak St, at Dapot. . .Taunton 2200 ATLANTIC^O Hancock Street. .. Granite 0993 
NEW BEDFORD— 27 Ashley Blvd New Bedford 350 




Your Home is as new as its 
bathroom ; why delay the in- 
stallation of this beautiful, mod- 
ern bathroom? 



(See inside back cover) 



• •